Category - armenia

  • April 28, 2011

    The first in a series of Easter Week reflections from a Middle Eastern perspective by regular Ekklesia contributor Dr Harry Hagopian. These talks (see MP3 below) are being broadcast by Premier Christian Radio, and are reproduced with their cooperation.

  • April 19, 2011

    For the first time since 1915, April 24 falls on Easter Sunday in the Armenian church calendar - also Armenian Genocide Remembrance Day.

  • April 18, 2011

    Deir Zor, the felicitous little village in Syria which bore witness, a century ago, to the death march of hundreds and thousands of helpless victims of an organised genocide against Armenians, is in the news again. Arthur Hagopian reports from Jerusalem.

  • April 18, 2011

    Two of the worst atrocities of the 20th century started in the month of April, reports Mike O'Sullivan.The killing of 1.5 million Armenians in Ottoman Empire Turkey in 1915 and 1916, and the slaughter of 800,000 Tutsis and moderate Hutus in Rwanda in 1994.

  • November 29, 2010

    It was an honour for new Ekklesia Associate Director Jordan Tchilingirian - who is from an Armenian background - and for me to attend the 2010 Constantinople Lecture last week.

  • November 29, 2010
  • November 16, 2010

    Ekklesia's good friend Harry Hagopian is giving the Annual Constantinople Lecture on Thursday 25 November 2010. Its topic is “The Armenian Genocide: A Way Forward?”

  • August 31, 2010

    How to sum up our Armenian realities today? What strikes me most is that Armenians have managed to survive manifold hardships throughout history without giving up on our faith, language and history.

  • August 30, 2010

    Previously, I referred to the horrific genocidal experiences that amputated Armenians from Ottoman Turkish society during WWI and cost the lives of scores of men, women and children - including member

  • August 27, 2010

    If two of the main cornerstones of the Armenian people are their faith and language, a third is the Armenian genocide that took place under cover of WWI.