Symon Hill's blog

Benefit cuts and cheap headlines

Around the time that Norman Tebbit made his famous comments about unemployed people getting on their bikes, my father was doing just that.

Divorced bishops and the teachings of Jesus

Divorced bishops and the teachings of Jesus

The Church of England is reported to be about to propose a change in its rules that will allow priests who are divorced to become bishops. Journalists looking for negative reactions to this news have not found them hard to find.

Cameron's cuts: We're not all in this together

David Cameron has said the government's massive cuts will be delivered in a way that “strengthens and unites the country”. His words remind me of his colleague's George Osborne's claim that, when it comes to tackling the economic situation, “we're all in this together”.

An Education Secretary with a warped view of history

An Education Secretary with a warped view of history

In the many comments made about Michael Gove's appointment as Education Secretary, one area that has generally been overlooked is his unhealthy attitude to history teaching.

The purple revolution

The purple revolution

Saturday's rally for Fair Votes was the most inspiring demonstration I have attended for quite a while.

We've been here before (350 years ago)

We've been here before (350 years ago)

History has great comic timing. It is 350 years this month since a major political compromise with an uncanny modern-day parallel.

Don't keep calm. Don't carry on.

Last week the British public did something extraordinary. With millions of different views and motivations, we managed to vote in such a way as to deliver a hung parliament, driving the first wedge in the door of a system that has for too long kept most politicians far removed from democratic accountability.

'Stable government' is no excuse for bad policy

'Stable government' is no excuse for bad policy

No coalition has yet been formed, but politicians on various sides are already talking of “stability” as if it over-rode all other considerations of democracy and policy.

The claims of the Christian Party

British Christians have firmly rejected sectarian party politics by offering almost no support at all to the Christian Party, who secured less than two per cent of the vote in each of the 71 constituencies they contested.

I can cope with the despair. It's the hope I can't stand

I can cope with the despair. It's the hope I can't stand

Today, I went to a polling station to do something which I hope never to do again. I voted in a general election conducted under the first-past-the-post system.