Commentary by Symon Hill

  • June 28, 2010

    Around the time that Norman Tebbit made his famous comments about unemployed people getting on their bikes, my father was doing just that.

  • June 27, 2010

    David Cameron has tried to use Armed Forces Day to whip up support for the unpopular war in Afghanistan, but the ruinous cost of ineffective military spending is clearly at odds with his government's rhetoric about the urgent need for cuts.

  • June 25, 2010

    The Church of England is reported to be about to propose a change in its rules that will allow priests who are divorced to become bishops. Journalists looking for negative reactions to this news have not found them hard to find.

  • June 8, 2010

    David Cameron has said the government's massive cuts will be delivered in a way that “strengthens and unites the country”. His words remind me of his colleague's George Osborne's claim that, when it comes to tackling the economic situation, “we'...

  • June 3, 2010

    When religion is invoked as a reason to stand up against injustice, a cynic might say that religion really has nothing to do with it, that the people involved would have taken the same political action anyway. So does religion really have the...

  • May 27, 2010

    In the many comments made about Michael Gove's appointment as Education Secretary, one area that has generally been overlooked is his unhealthy attitude to history teaching.

  • May 18, 2010

    Some Christians throw around the word "sin" fairly unthinkingly, while others have become rather embarrassed by it. To talk about "sin" clearly and justly, we need to address the confusion of both society and churches around two major issues -...

  • May 17, 2010

    Saturday's rally for Fair Votes was the most inspiring demonstration I have attended for quite a while.

  • May 13, 2010

    History has great comic timing. It is 350 years this month since a major political compromise with an uncanny modern-day parallel.

  • May 12, 2010

    Last week the British public did something extraordinary. With millions of different views and motivations, we managed to vote in such a way as to deliver a hung parliament, driving the first wedge in the door of a system that has for too long...

  • May 11, 2010

    No coalition has yet been formed, but politicians on various sides are already talking of “stability” as if it over-rode all other considerations of democracy and policy.

  • May 10, 2010

    British Christians have firmly rejected sectarian party politics by offering almost no support at all to the Christian Party, who secured less than two per cent of the vote in each of the 71...

  • May 6, 2010

    Today, I went to a polling station to do something which I hope never to do again. I voted in a general election conducted under the first-past-the-post system.

  • May 6, 2010

    For the first time in a British general election, significant numbers of voters will today have the opportunity to support candidates from parties described specifically as “Christian”. Symon Hill hopes that very few of them will choose to do so...

  • May 5, 2010

    The role of religion in the general election is far from straightforward. Politicians and the media need to recognise the diversity of religious engagement with politics on a much wider range of issues than they sometimes seem to notice.