church embraces new way of mooting - news from ekklesia

By staff writers
June 18, 2004

Church embraces new way of Mooting

-22/6/04

A pioneering new form of church is about to get official recognition when a minister is ordained to serve a church based on relationship rather than location, which will meet in the heart of Westminster.

Ian Mobsby is be ordained by the Bishop of London at St Paul's Cathedral on 26th June to work with the Moot Community, a mission-shaped project for the Diocese of London based at St Matthewís Church in Westminster.

He will be seeking to support and pastor this new form of church born out of the alternative worship movement and set up to relate to contemporary culture. In addition to developing new forms of worship, prayer and reflection, Moot seeks to be actively engaged with the arts and issues of social concern.

The project has come about through the vision and initiative of the Bishop of London, The Right Revd Richard Chartres, who recently appeared in the worldís first ëVirtual Churchí, church-of-fools.com and the Revd Philip Chester, Vicar of St Matthew's Westminster.

Moot is being seen as an example of and response to the Church of England's strategy to develop a 'mission shaped church'. A report by a working party chaired by the Bishop of Maidstone, the Right Rev Graham Cray, entitled; ìMission Shaped Churchî was presented to General Synod earlier this year. The report asked searching questions about how the church relates to networks, local communities and diversities of culture.

Ian Mobsby said; ìMoot is attempting to be and do church on the basis of relationship networks, rather than just purely parish and geography. Moot, uses multimedia and arts-driven forms of experimental worship designed to enable worship and spiritual exploration that is more accessible to unchurched or dechurched people.î

ìMany people in our fast consumer driven world are searching for spiritual meaning, and often do not find this in traditional church settings. There is a gap between contemporary culture and the church. This form of church seeks to enable such spiritual explorations by hosting discussion evenings, workshops, galleries and other 'questing' events drawing on the Christian tradition but in our current context.î An example of this from of worship and mission is the Labyrinth which has been on tour around cathedrals and art festivals since the summer 2001.

The project is part of the Diocese of Londonís commitment to encourage and develop new patterns of church life, arising from the London Challenge, which states a commitment to ìtelling and sharing the good news of Jesus Christ in 21st Century London for this generationî.

Ian Mobsby said; ìThe idea behind Moot is to empower a vision of church which is community based with a truly collaborative ministry.

The project has already received support from a number of Bishops including Graham Cray, the Recent Chair of the working group that produced 'Mission Shaped Church', Peter Price, the Bishop of Bath & Wells, Ann Morisy, author and chair of the 'Commission on Urban Life and Faith', Nick Mercer, Director for Ministry for the Diocese of London, and George Lings from the Church Armyís Sheffield Centre.

Church embraces new way of Mooting

-22/6/04

A pioneering new form of church is about to get official recognition when a minister is ordained to serve a church based on relationship rather than location, which will meet in the heart of Westminster.

Ian Mobsby is be ordained by the Bishop of London at St Paul's Cathedral on 26th June to work with the Moot Community, a mission-shaped project for the Diocese of London based at St Matthewís Church in Westminster.

He will be seeking to support and pastor this new form of church born out of the alternative worship movement and set up to relate to contemporary culture. In addition to developing new forms of worship, prayer and reflection, Moot seeks to be actively engaged with the arts and issues of social concern.

The project has come about through the vision and initiative of the Bishop of London, The Right Revd Richard Chartres, who recently appeared in the worldís first ëVirtual Churchí, church-of-fools.com and the Revd Philip Chester, Vicar of St Matthew's Westminster.

Moot is being seen as an example of and response to the Church of England's strategy to develop a 'mission shaped church'. A report by a working party chaired by the Bishop of Maidstone, the Right Rev Graham Cray, entitled; ìMission Shaped Churchî was presented to General Synod earlier this year. The report asked searching questions about how the church relates to networks, local communities and diversities of culture.

Ian Mobsby said; ìMoot is attempting to be and do church on the basis of relationship networks, rather than just purely parish and geography. Moot, uses multimedia and arts-driven forms of experimental worship designed to enable worship and spiritual exploration that is more accessible to unchurched or dechurched people.î

ìMany people in our fast consumer driven world are searching for spiritual meaning, and often do not find this in traditional church settings. There is a gap between contemporary culture and the church. This form of church seeks to enable such spiritual explorations by hosting discussion evenings, workshops, galleries and other 'questing' events drawing on the Christian tradition but in our current context.î An example of this from of worship and mission is the Labyrinth which has been on tour around cathedrals and art festivals since the summer 2001.

The project is part of the Diocese of Londonís commitment to encourage and develop new patterns of church life, arising from the London Challenge, which states a commitment to ìtelling and sharing the good news of Jesus Christ in 21st Century London for this generationî.

Ian Mobsby said; ìThe idea behind Moot is to empower a vision of church which is community based with a truly collaborative ministry.

The project has already received support from a number of Bishops including Graham Cray, the Recent Chair of the working group that produced 'Mission Shaped Church', Peter Price, the Bishop of Bath & Wells, Ann Morisy, author and chair of the 'Commission on Urban Life and Faith', Nick Mercer, Director for Ministry for the Diocese of London, and George Lings from the Church Armyís Sheffield Centre.

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