Williams to make 9/11 speech praising Islam - news from ekklesia

Williams to make 9/11 speech praising Islam - news from ekklesia

By staff writers
26 Jul 2004

Williams to make 9/11 speech praising Islam

-26/7/04

The Archbishop of Canterbury is to mark the third anniversary of the September 11 terrorist attacks by praising Islam in an address from the pulpit of an Egyptian mosque, reports the Sunday Times.

Rowan Williams has accepted an invitation to speak at Al-Azhar University in Cairo, considered by many to be the Muslim world's most important centre of learning, the newspaper said.

He will speak to his Muslim congregation of the common ground between Christianity and Islam with their shared inheritance as "children of Abraham".

"It is a very significant moment in the history of our two faiths and especially coming from a man of his stature and learning," Zaki Badawi, the founder of the Muslim College in London, told the newspaper.

"This will cement the relationship between Christianity and Islam because he will point out those aspects which unite the two religions," Badawi said.

"The Muslims throughout the world feel beleaguered and a comforting word from Archbishop Williams will assure our people they are not alone."

Al-Azhar is considered the most important religious university in the Muslim world and is attended by 90,000 students.

Williams to make 9/11 speech praising Islam

-26/7/04

The Archbishop of Canterbury is to mark the third anniversary of the September 11 terrorist attacks by praising Islam in an address from the pulpit of an Egyptian mosque, reports the Sunday Times.

Rowan Williams has accepted an invitation to speak at Al-Azhar University in Cairo, considered by many to be the Muslim world's most important centre of learning, the newspaper said.

He will speak to his Muslim congregation of the common ground between Christianity and Islam with their shared inheritance as "children of Abraham".

"It is a very significant moment in the history of our two faiths and especially coming from a man of his stature and learning," Zaki Badawi, the founder of the Muslim College in London, told the newspaper.

"This will cement the relationship between Christianity and Islam because he will point out those aspects which unite the two religions," Badawi said.

"The Muslims throughout the world feel beleaguered and a comforting word from Archbishop Williams will assure our people they are not alone."

Al-Azhar is considered the most important religious university in the Muslim world and is attended by 90,000 students.

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