church bombs in iraq a response to 'crusader war' - news from ekklesia

By staff writers
August 3, 2004

Church bombs in Iraq a response to 'crusader war'

-3/8/04

A group in Iraq have claimed responsibility for the series of church bombs at the weekend in a statement posted on a Web site, saying they were a response to the U.S. "crusader war" and evangelization, reports the Reuters news agency.

The language of "crusade" was used by George Bush in the run up to the war in Iraq. Bush originally caused an uproar by telling reporters: "This crusade, this war on terrorism, is going to take awhile." But the word was also revived by the Bush-Cheney election campaign as recently as April this year.

"You wanted a crusader war, so these are the results. ... We warned you," the statement by a little-known Islamist group calling itself the Planning and Follow-Up Organization in Iraq said on a site where a number of claims have been posted in recent weeks.

"We were able Sunday to direct several painful strikes at the dens of evil, corruption, immorality and evangelization."

Iraq accused al Qaeda ally Abu Musab al-Zarqawi earlier Monday of carrying out the coordinated bombings, saying the militants wanted to drive Christians out of the country.

It was not known if there was any connection between Zarqawi and the Planning and Follow-Up Organization in Iraq.

Car bombs on Sunday hit at least five churches in Iraq, including four in Baghdad. Police defused two more bombs outside other churches, one in Baghdad and the other in Mosul. The attacks killed at least 11 people and wounded 55.

"America didn't only occupy and militarily sweep Muslim countries, it also set up hundreds of evangelization organizations and printed books about the Holocaust and distributed them in Muslim countries to wrench Muslims from their religion and make them Christians," the statement said.

"The wars now in Iraq and Afghanistan are hateful crusader wars against Muslims by America and its minions, with the blessing of the Pope who has the leaders of America between his hands like slaves," it said.

Christians make up an estimated 3 percent of the Iraqi population and have generally had good ties with the Muslim community, although several recent attacks have targeted alcohol sellers, most of whom are Christians.

A group fighting US occupation in Falluja in April also called on the United Nations to stop the US siege of the town or it said it would attack Iraqi Christians.

Church bombs in Iraq a response to 'crusader war'

-3/8/04

A group in Iraq have claimed responsibility for the series of church bombs at the weekend in a statement posted on a Web site, saying they were a response to the U.S. "crusader war" and evangelization, reports the Reuters news agency.

The language of "crusade" was used by George Bush in the run up to the war in Iraq. Bush originally caused an uproar by telling reporters: "This crusade, this war on terrorism, is going to take awhile." But the word was also revived by the Bush-Cheney election campaign as recently as April this year.

"You wanted a crusader war, so these are the results. ... We warned you," the statement by a little-known Islamist group calling itself the Planning and Follow-Up Organization in Iraq said on a site where a number of claims have been posted in recent weeks.

"We were able Sunday to direct several painful strikes at the dens of evil, corruption, immorality and evangelization."

Iraq accused al Qaeda ally Abu Musab al-Zarqawi earlier Monday of carrying out the coordinated bombings, saying the militants wanted to drive Christians out of the country.

It was not known if there was any connection between Zarqawi and the Planning and Follow-Up Organization in Iraq.

Car bombs on Sunday hit at least five churches in Iraq, including four in Baghdad. Police defused two more bombs outside other churches, one in Baghdad and the other in Mosul. The attacks killed at least 11 people and wounded 55.

"America didn't only occupy and militarily sweep Muslim countries, it also set up hundreds of evangelization organizations and printed books about the Holocaust and distributed them in Muslim countries to wrench Muslims from their religion and make them Christians," the statement said.

"The wars now in Iraq and Afghanistan are hateful crusader wars against Muslims by America and its minions, with the blessing of the Pope who has the leaders of America between his hands like slaves," it said.

Christians make up an estimated 3 percent of the Iraqi population and have generally had good ties with the Muslim community, although several recent attacks have targeted alcohol sellers, most of whom are Christians.

A group fighting US occupation in Falluja in April also called on the United Nations to stop the US siege of the town or it said it would attack Iraqi Christians.

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