bush claims god for his foreign policy - news from ekklesia

By staff writers
October 14, 2004

Bush claims God for his foreign policy

-14/10/04

In a concerted attempt to corner the conservative Christian vote in next month's presidential election campaign, Republican candidate George W. Bush yesterday used the last of three TV debates with Democrat rival John Kerry to co-opt God to his campaign.

In an exchange that focussed mostly on what psephologists call 'voter appeal issues', Bush said he believed that freedom was God's gift, and that this was a core element of his administration's foreign policy.

Kerry sought to diffuse his opponent's attempt to employ faith for partisan purposes by responding that everything was a gift from the Almighty.

The religious Right is backing the Bush campaign fervently, in the hope that many of the evangelical voters who stayed at home in the last election will turn out this time. Kerry is aiming to claim the votes of Black people and disenfranchised groups.

Other Christian spokespersons, such as Jim Wallis of Call to Renewal, a broad-based alliance with roots in the smaller progressive evangelical sector, have criticised both campaigns for their militaristic language and appeals to self-interest.

'Bush equates divine freedom with his own policies', said one commentator. 'But he has little or nothing to say about enemy-loving, social justice, care for the vulnerable and Jesusís strong criticism of wealth.'

Another contentious issue among religious voters is abortion.

'I believe that choice is a woman's choice. It's between a woman, God and her doctor,' said Kerry last night. Bush talked about using public policy to discourage abortion, but did not to go into detail.

A number of Democrat supporters have sought to distinguish between being pro-choice and being pro-abortion, and Republicans are not wholly united on the matter either.

Bush claims God for his foreign policy

-14/10/04

In a concerted attempt to corner the conservative Christian vote in next month's presidential election campaign, Republican candidate George W. Bush yesterday used the last of three TV debates with Democrat rival John Kerry to co-opt God to his campaign.

In an exchange that focussed mostly on what psephologists call 'voter appeal issues', Bush said he believed that freedom was God's gift, and that this was a core element of his administration's foreign policy.

Kerry sought to diffuse his opponent's attempt to employ faith for partisan purposes by responding that everything was a gift from the Almighty.

The religious Right is backing the Bush campaign fervently, in the hope that many of the evangelical voters who stayed at home in the last election will turn out this time. Kerry is aiming to claim the votes of Black people and disenfranchised groups.

Other Christian spokespersons, such as Jim Wallis of Call to Renewal, a broad-based alliance with roots in the smaller progressive evangelical sector, have criticised both campaigns for their militaristic language and appeals to self-interest.

'Bush equates divine freedom with his own policies', said one commentator. 'But he has little or nothing to say about enemy-loving, social justice, care for the vulnerable and Jesusís strong criticism of wealth.'

Another contentious issue among religious voters is abortion.

'I believe that choice is a woman's choice. It's between a woman, God and her doctor,' said Kerry last night. Bush talked about using public policy to discourage abortion, but did not to go into detail.

A number of Democrat supporters have sought to distinguish between being pro-choice and being pro-abortion, and Republicans are not wholly united on the matter either.

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