Christian agencies welcome Sudan peace but warn over Darfur - news from ekklesia

By staff writers
January 10, 2005

Christian agencies welcome Sudan peace but warn over Darfur

-10/01/05

Christian aid agencies working in Sudan have welcomed the historic signing of the long-awaited comprehensive Sudan peace agreement.

Christian Aid and Teafund were amongst six agencies issuing a statement in Nairobi, which called on the international community to ensure the fledgling peace deal is implemented.

"The agreement offers Sudan the best hope yet for peace. For millions of displaced people it will signal the start of their journey home. It is the start of the process of healing for the hundreds of thousands of ordinary people who have borne the brunt of this cruel conflict," said Cynthia Gaigals, a spokesperson for the agencies.

The relief official said it was vital that the international community continue to work with the Sudanese government and the Sudan People's Liberation's Movement to ensure that the peace deal is implemented.

"The next six months are the most fragile for this fledgling peace deal. A strong peacekeeping mission must be deployed quickly by the United Nations. Sudan has been ravaged by civil war for generations, and donors need to commit funds for essential development," said Gaigals.

The six agencies are CARE International, Christian Aid, International Rescue Committee, Oxfam International, Save the Children UK and Tearfund.

But the agencies also suggested that despite the agreement, insufficient attention has been given to the underlying causes of Sudan's conflict, contributing to continued fighting in Darfur and tensions in the Beja area in east Sudan.

Christian Aid pointed out that the deal did not take into account the separate clash in the western province of Darfur, which it said posed the greatest threat to stability.

A meeting of donor countries is scheduled to meet in Oslo, Norway on 15 January. It is imperative, said the aid agency, that donors commit the funds needed to bring the country out of the devastation caused by generations of civil war.

"In Darfur nearly two million people have been driven from their homes, continued abuses and unrelenting attacks are a tragic light on the peace process," Gaigals said.

The Sudanese government and southern rebels signed a final comprehensive peace accord in Nairobi on Sunday, finishing a two year peace process which it is hoped will end the 21-year-old civil war in southern Sudan - the longest-running in Africa.

Christian agencies welcome Sudan peace but warn over Darfur

-10/01/05

Christian aid agencies working in Sudan have welcomed the historic signing of the long-awaited comprehensive Sudan peace agreement.

Christian Aid and Teafund were amongst six agencies issuing a statement in Nairobi, which called on the international community to ensure the fledgling peace deal is implemented.

"The agreement offers Sudan the best hope yet for peace. For millions of displaced people it will signal the start of their journey home. It is the start of the process of healing for the hundreds of thousands of ordinary people who have borne the brunt of this cruel conflict," said Cynthia Gaigals, a spokesperson for the agencies.

The relief official said it was vital that the international community continue to work with the Sudanese government and the Sudan People's Liberation's Movement to ensure that the peace deal is implemented.

"The next six months are the most fragile for this fledgling peace deal. A strong peacekeeping mission must be deployed quickly by the United Nations. Sudan has been ravaged by civil war for generations, and donors need to commit funds for essential development," said Gaigals.

The six agencies are CARE International, Christian Aid, International Rescue Committee, Oxfam International, Save the Children UK and Tearfund.

But the agencies also suggested that despite the agreement, insufficient attention has been given to the underlying causes of Sudan's conflict, contributing to continued fighting in Darfur and tensions in the Beja area in east Sudan.

Christian Aid pointed out that the deal did not take into account the separate clash in the western province of Darfur, which it said posed the greatest threat to stability.

A meeting of donor countries is scheduled to meet in Oslo, Norway on 15 January. It is imperative, said the aid agency, that donors commit the funds needed to bring the country out of the devastation caused by generations of civil war.

"In Darfur nearly two million people have been driven from their homes, continued abuses and unrelenting attacks are a tragic light on the peace process," Gaigals said.

The Sudanese government and southern rebels signed a final comprehensive peace accord in Nairobi on Sunday, finishing a two year peace process which it is hoped will end the 21-year-old civil war in southern Sudan - the longest-running in Africa.

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