ëBad boyí Prince Harry is charity icon of the young - news from ekklesia

By staff writers
February 11, 2005

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ëBad boyí Prince Harry is charity icon of the young

-11/02/05

Despite his recent fancy dress antics and bad boy image, ëroyal rebelí Prince Harry has come top of a national youth survey as the best person in Britain to champion a charity cause.

The survey, conducted by Christian relief and development agency World Vision, shows Harry received over 50% more votes than football icon David Beckham ñ the next most popular choice.

The survey commissioned to support the UKís biggest youth fundraiser ñ the 24-hour Famine ñ also looked at the responsibilities young children have in todayís society and found that over 50% of the respondents surveyed expected to be domestically dependent on their parents until they were at least 21 years old. (5% of those asked wanted to stay at home foreverÖ!)

This yearís 24-hour Famine appeal is focused on helping children who have been orphaned through Aids and on highlighting the fact that, day in, day out, many children fulfil what are normally parental responsibilities.

The survey revealed that over 80% of the UKís youth cite ëmaking their bedsí, ëkeeping their room tidyí and ëoccasionally helping with household choresí as their contribution to life at home. Less than a quarter of the respondents had ever cooked a meal or been asked to look after a sibling, an everyday responsibility for orphaned children in some of the world poorest countries.

But when questioned about the UKís aid contributions to developing countries, over 60% of the respondents felt that, as a nation, we should give more.

Nearly 20% of 12-18 year olds in the UK get over £20 a week from their parents, more then 40% receive around £5. In comparison, £6 can provide food and support for an orphan in a developing country for one month.

From 18-20 February, thousands of young people will be sponsored to go without food for 24 hours to raise money for this yearís 24-hour Famine.

The survey was commissioned by international relief and development agency World Vision and used a sample population of 900 male and female 12 to 18-year-old children from targeted regions throughout the UK.

Find books now:

ëBad boyí Prince Harry is charity icon of the young

-11/02/05

Despite his recent fancy dress antics and bad boy image, ëroyal rebelí Prince Harry has come top of a national youth survey as the best person in Britain to champion a charity cause.

The survey, conducted by Christian relief and development agency World Vision, shows Harry received over 50% more votes than football icon David Beckham ñ the next most popular choice.

The survey commissioned to support the UKís biggest youth fundraiser ñ the 24-hour Famine ñ also looked at the responsibilities young children have in todayís society and found that over 50% of the respondents surveyed expected to be domestically dependent on their parents until they were at least 21 years old. (5% of those asked wanted to stay at home foreverÖ!)

This yearís 24-hour Famine appeal is focused on helping children who have been orphaned through Aids and on highlighting the fact that, day in, day out, many children fulfil what are normally parental responsibilities.

The survey revealed that over 80% of the UKís youth cite ëmaking their bedsí, ëkeeping their room tidyí and ëoccasionally helping with household choresí as their contribution to life at home. Less than a quarter of the respondents had ever cooked a meal or been asked to look after a sibling, an everyday responsibility for orphaned children in some of the world poorest countries.

But when questioned about the UKís aid contributions to developing countries, over 60% of the respondents felt that, as a nation, we should give more.

Nearly 20% of 12-18 year olds in the UK get over £20 a week from their parents, more then 40% receive around £5. In comparison, £6 can provide food and support for an orphan in a developing country for one month.

From 18-20 February, thousands of young people will be sponsored to go without food for 24 hours to raise money for this yearís 24-hour Famine.

The survey was commissioned by international relief and development agency World Vision and used a sample population of 900 male and female 12 to 18-year-old children from targeted regions throughout the UK.

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