Church debate on Charles and Camilla blocked - news from ekklesia

By staff writers
February 14, 2005

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Church debate on Charles and Camilla blocked

-14/02/05

The Archbishop of Canterbury has blocked attempts to have a debate at this weeks Synod of the Church of England about Prince Charles' forthcoming marriage to Camilla Parker Bowles, reports the BBC.

Under Church rules, Camilla Parker Bowles, as a divorcee whose partner is still alive, is not eligible to marry. The couple will therefore have a civil wedding, and then a service of blessing.

As pointed out by the Christian thinktank Ekklesia and widely reported in the press at the weekend, the Church is now in the 'anomalous' position of having as its future Governor and Defender of the Faith ìa man who even the Archbishop of Canterbury cannot permit to re-marry in his own Church using the official liturgy he is meant to uphold.î

Ekklesia has called for an ìecumenical reconsideration of church-state relationsî.

The matter however will not be debated at this weekís Synod, which is already set to address two other controversial issues; proposals to ordain women as bishops and the Church's split over homosexuality.

Women were first ordained as priests in the Church of England 10 years ago.

BBC correspondent Robert Pigott suggests they were becoming increasingly impatient at what they claim is the Church's discrimination in denying them a role as bishops.

But some members fear overturning the long history of male-only bishops could further divide a church already weakened by its dispute over homosexuality.

The synod faces still another disagreement over plans to end the ownership of the freehold of their churches and vicarages, enjoyed by most clergy.

The ownership effectively gives them a job for life.

Other priests have very little job security and a universal system of employment contracts is planned.

Other issues being debated include a new report which recommends that the church adopt 'creation care prayers', organic bread and other natural materials in worship as well as an education programme, car pooling and recycling.

Find books now:

Church debate on Charles and Camilla blocked

-14/02/05

The Archbishop of Canterbury has blocked attempts to have a debate at this weeks Synod of the Church of England about Prince Charles' forthcoming marriage to Camilla Parker Bowles, reports the BBC.

Under Church rules, Camilla Parker Bowles, as a divorcee whose partner is still alive, is not eligible to marry. The couple will therefore have a civil wedding, and then a service of blessing.

As pointed out by the Christian thinktank Ekklesia and widely reported in the press at the weekend, the Church is now in the 'anomalous' position of having as its future Governor and Defender of the Faith ìa man who even the Archbishop of Canterbury cannot permit to re-marry in his own Church using the official liturgy he is meant to uphold.î

Ekklesia has called for an ìecumenical reconsideration of church-state relationsî.

The matter however will not be debated at this weekís Synod, which is already set to address two other controversial issues; proposals to ordain women as bishops and the Church's split over homosexuality.

Women were first ordained as priests in the Church of England 10 years ago.

BBC correspondent Robert Pigott suggests they were becoming increasingly impatient at what they claim is the Church's discrimination in denying them a role as bishops.

But some members fear overturning the long history of male-only bishops could further divide a church already weakened by its dispute over homosexuality.

The synod faces still another disagreement over plans to end the ownership of the freehold of their churches and vicarages, enjoyed by most clergy.

The ownership effectively gives them a job for life.

Other priests have very little job security and a universal system of employment contracts is planned.

Other issues being debated include a new report which recommends that the church adopt 'creation care prayers', organic bread and other natural materials in worship as well as an education programme, car pooling and recycling.

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