MP joins churches in condemning actions of Springer protestors - news from ekklesia

By staff writers
February 24, 2005

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MP joins churches in condemning actions of Springer protestors

-24/02/05

An MP has joined church denominations and parachurch organisations in condemning the actions of the religious pressure group 'Christian Voice'

The MP John Cryer, called the group "fundamentalist thugs" and accused them of "strong-arming" a cancer charity into rejecting a donation from the proceeds of a performance of "Jerry Springer: The Opera", because they considered the campaigners considered the money to be 'tainted'.

Reports in the press have suggested that Stephen Green from Christian voice promised that Christians would protest against the charity if they accepted the donation.

The statement by the Essex MP in the House of Commons followed condemnation by two church denominations.

A spokesman for the Church of England said: ìIt is absolutely not what we would expect people in the Church of England to identify with as being a correct or kind way to behave towards others. People should be encouraged to show kindness and compassion to others and should not be in the business of stifling that.î

Reverend Sheila Maxey, moderator of the United Reformed Church, said that Christian Voice was ìa disgraceî and not representative of the Christian community, which it was in danger of bringing into disrepute.

The director of the Christian thinktank Ekklesia also challenged the religious campaigners in a head-to-head on live radio yesterday. Speaking on BBC Radio 2's Jeremy Vine show, he suggested that Christian Voice should make up any money lost by the cancer charity as a result of the campaigner's actions.

Defending his position, Stephen Green from Christian Voice said that his actions were ìprincipledî and that he was challenging ìone of the stereotypes of Christianity that it is a religion for women and wimpsî.

Green also said that he believed God would financially ërewardí the charity for refusing the donation.

However, when asked in the live programme on BBC Radio by Ekklesiaís director Jonathan Bartley to make up any shortfall in the charities funding if his prediction failed to come true, Stephen Green refused.

Green also accused denominations that had criticised his actions of ìjumping on a bandwagonî.

Find books now:

MP joins churches in condemning actions of Springer protestors

-24/02/05

An MP has joined church denominations and parachurch organisations in condemning the actions of the religious pressure group 'Christian Voice'

The MP John Cryer, called the group "fundamentalist thugs" and accused them of "strong-arming" a cancer charity into rejecting a donation from the proceeds of a performance of "Jerry Springer: The Opera", because they considered the campaigners considered the money to be 'tainted'.

Reports in the press have suggested that Stephen Green from Christian voice promised that Christians would protest against the charity if they accepted the donation.

The statement by the Essex MP in the House of Commons followed condemnation by two church denominations.

A spokesman for the Church of England said: ìIt is absolutely not what we would expect people in the Church of England to identify with as being a correct or kind way to behave towards others. People should be encouraged to show kindness and compassion to others and should not be in the business of stifling that.î

Reverend Sheila Maxey, moderator of the United Reformed Church, said that Christian Voice was ìa disgraceî and not representative of the Christian community, which it was in danger of bringing into disrepute.

The director of the Christian thinktank Ekklesia also challenged the religious campaigners in a head-to-head on live radio yesterday. Speaking on BBC Radio 2's Jeremy Vine show, he suggested that Christian Voice should make up any money lost by the cancer charity as a result of the campaigner's actions.

Defending his position, Stephen Green from Christian Voice said that his actions were ìprincipledî and that he was challenging ìone of the stereotypes of Christianity that it is a religion for women and wimpsî.

Green also said that he believed God would financially ërewardí the charity for refusing the donation.

However, when asked in the live programme on BBC Radio by Ekklesiaís director Jonathan Bartley to make up any shortfall in the charities funding if his prediction failed to come true, Stephen Green refused.

Green also accused denominations that had criticised his actions of ìjumping on a bandwagonî.

Although the views expressed in this article do not necessarily represent the views of Ekklesia, the article may reflect Ekklesia's values. If you use Ekklesia's news briefings please consider making a donation to sponsor Ekklesia's work here.