Sentamu promises to speak out on justice - news from ekklesia

By staff writers
October 6, 2005

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Sentamu promises to speak out on justice

-06/10/05

Dr John Sentamu promised to speak out on issues of justice yesterday after he was formally confirmed as the new Archbishop of York.

The Church of England's first black archbishop is an outspoken critic of racism.

Sentamu has recently said that he believes the church must face up to racism and the under-representation of minority ethnic groups in its own ranks.

He also played a major role in encouraging the churches to speak out against institutional racism in 1999, following the public enquiry in the wake of the death of teenager Stephen Lawrence. He also chaired the Damilola Taylor review.

Speaking yesterday he urged his fellow Christians to spread gospel values through "words and actions".

He also told the Guardian newspaper he would have no difficulty ordaining women bishops and has condemned the language used by some in the Anglican communion about gay men and lesbians.

More radical Christians may point to the contrast between his stands for justice, and the ceremony surrounding his confirmation as the new archbishop.

Before a congregation including his wife Margaret and their children Grace, 30, and Geoffrey, 25, he was granted the "rights, dignities, honours, privileges and appurtenances" of the post of Lord Archbishop of York, Primate of England and Metropolitan.

He then swore his allegiance to the monarch and promised to uphold the Scriptures, Creeds, Book of Common prayer and the 39 Articles.

The confirmation ceremony, which is used for every diocesan bishop, has its roots in the 12th and 13th centuries and was enshrined in the Appointment of Bishops Act in 1534.

Dr Sentamu, 56, was educated in Uganda, where he worked as a lawyer and was an outspoken critic of Idi Amin's regime.

Find books now:

Sentamu promises to speak out on justice

-06/10/05

Dr John Sentamu promised to speak out on issues of justice yesterday after he was formally confirmed as the new Archbishop of York.

The Church of England's first black archbishop is an outspoken critic of racism.

Sentamu has recently said that he believes the church must face up to racism and the under-representation of minority ethnic groups in its own ranks.

He also played a major role in encouraging the churches to speak out against institutional racism in 1999, following the public enquiry in the wake of the death of teenager Stephen Lawrence. He also chaired the Damilola Taylor review.

Speaking yesterday he urged his fellow Christians to spread gospel values through "words and actions".

He also told the Guardian newspaper he would have no difficulty ordaining women bishops and has condemned the language used by some in the Anglican communion about gay men and lesbians.

More radical Christians may point to the contrast between his stands for justice, and the ceremony surrounding his confirmation as the new archbishop.

Before a congregation including his wife Margaret and their children Grace, 30, and Geoffrey, 25, he was granted the "rights, dignities, honours, privileges and appurtenances" of the post of Lord Archbishop of York, Primate of England and Metropolitan.

He then swore his allegiance to the monarch and promised to uphold the Scriptures, Creeds, Book of Common prayer and the 39 Articles.

The confirmation ceremony, which is used for every diocesan bishop, has its roots in the 12th and 13th centuries and was enshrined in the Appointment of Bishops Act in 1534.

Dr Sentamu, 56, was educated in Uganda, where he worked as a lawyer and was an outspoken critic of Idi Amin's regime.

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