Chief Rabbi calls for religious UN

By staff writers
March 20, 2006

Chief Rabbi calls for religious UN

-20/03/06

The Chief Rabbi of Israel has called for the formation of a "United Nations of religious groups".

Rabbi Yona Metzger was addressing the Second World Congress of Imams and Rabbis for Peace in Seville, Spain.

He called for the creation of a world body with representatives from the major religious groups.

Many of the Imams and Rabbis, who number in excess of 150 and are among the most influential Jewish and Moslem leaders in the world, say the world is in crisis and it is time they acted to restore justice, respect and peace.

The delegates have made it very clear that now is the time for concrete initiatives.

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At the opening ceremony on Sunday Rabbi Yona Metzger said his idea of a "United Nations of religious groups" could "bring a bridge between religions to help the bridge of the diplomatic way".

That plan has broad support from key participants like Frederico Major, the co-president of the Alliance for Civilisations, the lobby group for international conflict resolution, supported by the United Nations and initiated by Spain's Prime Minister, Jose Luis Rodriguez Zapatero.

The speeches at this conference rather than using polite, diplomatic language have at times been brutally direct. When the Rabbi Metzger harangued mainstream Muslims for not standing up to Osama bin Laden, Islamic leaders nodded in agreement.

Both Muslim and Jewish leaders have shown a preparedness to take criticism.

There have also been strong expressions of opposition to any killing in the name of religion.

At the end of the opening ceremony, the Muslim delegation sang an oration to the Prophet Mohammed before resuming discussions about the ideas they plan to present to their Jewish counterparts.

The religious leaders have three days to come up with a manifesto that aims to convert their words into actions.

The aim of the Second Congress are to promote encounter and dialogue between Jewish and Muslim religious leaders in order to build trust and confidence for developing common projects in seeking common good. It also seeks to create an opportunity for religious leaders to use their influence in conflict resolution in various regions of the world.

The First Congress, held in Brussels in January 2005, was an historic milestone in Jewish-Muslim dialogue.

The meetings are an initiative of Hommes de Parole, a Paris-based organization dedicated to humanitarian efforts and conflict resolution.

Joining the Jewish and Muslim leaders are several Christians.

Chief Rabbi calls for religious UN

-20/03/06

The Chief Rabbi of Israel has called for the formation of a "United Nations of religious groups".

Rabbi Yona Metzger was addressing the Second World Congress of Imams and Rabbis for Peace in Seville, Spain.

He called for the creation of a world body with representatives from the major religious groups.

Many of the Imams and Rabbis, who number in excess of 150 and are among the most influential Jewish and Moslem leaders in the world, say the world is in crisis and it is time they acted to restore justice, respect and peace.

The delegates have made it very clear that now is the time for concrete initiatives.

Related Articles

At the opening ceremony on Sunday Rabbi Yona Metzger said his idea of a "United Nations of religious groups" could "bring a bridge between religions to help the bridge of the diplomatic way".

That plan has broad support from key participants like Frederico Major, the co-president of the Alliance for Civilisations, the lobby group for international conflict resolution, supported by the United Nations and initiated by Spain's Prime Minister, Jose Luis Rodriguez Zapatero.

The speeches at this conference rather than using polite, diplomatic language have at times been brutally direct. When the Rabbi Metzger harangued mainstream Muslims for not standing up to Osama bin Laden, Islamic leaders nodded in agreement.

Both Muslim and Jewish leaders have shown a preparedness to take criticism.

There have also been strong expressions of opposition to any killing in the name of religion.

At the end of the opening ceremony, the Muslim delegation sang an oration to the Prophet Mohammed before resuming discussions about the ideas they plan to present to their Jewish counterparts.

The religious leaders have three days to come up with a manifesto that aims to convert their words into actions.

The aim of the Second Congress are to promote encounter and dialogue between Jewish and Muslim religious leaders in order to build trust and confidence for developing common projects in seeking common good. It also seeks to create an opportunity for religious leaders to use their influence in conflict resolution in various regions of the world.

The First Congress, held in Brussels in January 2005, was an historic milestone in Jewish-Muslim dialogue.

The meetings are an initiative of Hommes de Parole, a Paris-based organization dedicated to humanitarian efforts and conflict resolution.

Joining the Jewish and Muslim leaders are several Christians.

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