'Egg-spose' on fowl trade

By staff writers
6 Oct 2006

'Egg-spose' on fowl trade

-06/10/06

In a unique 'egg-spose' the thinktank Ekklesia has shone a light into the murky pond that is the global duck trade.

Comparing the relative decadence of the West with the needs of poor neighbours in the global south, Ekklesia has revealed the paltry (some would say 'poultry') sums involved.

Ekklesia has discovered that it only costs £24 to send 16 ducks to the developing world, where duck farming will provide some of the world's poorest people with self-sufficiency, and allow them to free themselves from loans, working toward a more secure future.

The ducks can be sent this Christmas, as part of Christian Aidís pioneering Present Aid Scheme which allows you to donate a range of livestock as a gift on someone else's behalf. A card is then sent to your friend or family member, on whose behalf the gift has been made, with your personal message. The ducks head towards the Friends in Village Development Bangladesh. The cost is the equivalent of £1.50 a duck.

Christian Aid explains how people who have been devastated by horrific floods can recover with the help of these feathered friends which are kindly donated by people who are looking for alternative, ethical or just plain wacky (some might say 'quaky') gifts to send at Christmas.

Ekklesia, which promotes such schemes through Christian Aid, Oxfam, UNICEF and World Vision, and has raised a quarter of a million pounds over the last two years through them, is however contrasting the practice with the price of a duck in top London restaurants, or the average Christmas turkey.

"The comparison is a bit of fun" said Jonathan Bartley, Ekklesia's co-director, "but there is of course a serious side".

"The average family spends about £500 on presents, entertainment and food over the Christmas period, and this included a lot is unwanted clutter. But just a small proportion of that money can permanently change the lives of some of the world's poorest people - and it can be great fun to do!"

If you would like to help people rise out of poverty this Christmas with the help of ducks, or a whole range of other farming and development related gifts this Christmas then visit: Christian Aid's Present Aid, World Vision's Alternative Gift Catalogue, UNICEF's Inspired Gifts or Oxfam's Unwrapped gift collection

If you would like to help people rise out of poverty this Christmas with the help of ducks, or a whole range of other farming and development related gifts this Christmas then visit: Christian Aid's Present Aid, World Vision's Alternative Gift Catalogue, UNICEF's Inspired Gifts or Oxfam's Unwrapped gift collection

In a unique 'egg-spose' the thinktank Ekklesia has shone a light into the murky pond that is the global duck trade.

Comparing the relative decadence of the West with the needs of poor neighbours in the global south, Ekklesia has revealed the paltry (some would say 'poultry') sums involved.

Ekklesia has discovered that it only costs £24 to send 16 ducks to the developing world, where duck farming will provide some of the world's poorest people with self-sufficiency, and allow them to free themselves from loans, working toward a more secure future.

The ducks can be sent this Christmas, as part of Christian Aidís pioneering Present Aid Scheme which allows you to donate a range of livestock as a gift on someone else's behalf. A card is then sent to your friend or family member, on whose behalf the gift has been made, with your personal message. The ducks head towards the Friends in Village Development Bangladesh. The cost is the equivalent of £1.50 a duck.

Christian Aid explains how people who have been devastated by horrific floods can recover with the help of these feathered friends which are kindly donated by people who are looking for alternative, ethical or just plain wacky (some might say 'quaky') gifts to send at Christmas.

Ekklesia, which promotes such schemes through Christian Aid, Oxfam, UNICEF and World Vision, and has raised a quarter of a million pounds over the last two years through them, is however contrasting the practice with the price of a duck in top London restaurants, or the average Christmas turkey.

"The comparison is a bit of fun" said Jonathan Bartley, Ekklesia's co-director, "but there is of course a serious side".

"The average family spends about £500 on presents, entertainment and food over the Christmas period, and this included a lot is unwanted clutter. But just a small proportion of that money can permanently change the lives of some of the world's poorest people - and it can be great fun to do!"

If you would like to help people rise out of poverty this Christmas with the help of ducks, or a whole range of other farming and development related gifts this Christmas then visit: Christian Aid's Present Aid, World Vision's Alternative Gift Catalogue, UNICEF's Inspired Gifts or Oxfam's Unwrapped gift collection

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