'Work a Miracle' appeal launched to tackle HIV/AIDS

By staff writers
December 1, 2006

'Work a Miracle' appeal launched to tackle HIV/AIDS

-01/12/06

Over 250 young adults in Northern Ireland will help Christian relief and development agency Tearfund launch their 'Work a Miracle' appeal at the Strand cinema, Belfast, today, World Aids day.

One in three infected mothers pass HIV on to their newborn child, yet it costs just £7 to pay for two doses of medicine which reduces this risk to 5% says the charity.

Tearfundís Work a Miracle Appeal aims to help women get access to medicines and information that will prevent their babies being born with HIV.

In his World AIDS Day appeal to local churches, Tim Magowan, Tearfundís Manager in Ireland Manager said, ìMoney canít buy miracles ñ we know that. But it can buy clinics, education, orphan care and training for the volunteers to provide counselling and testing. These few measures can go a long way to try and prevent a mother passing HIV to her child.î

Decked out in all its splendour, the Strand Cinema will re-live its heady days when more than 250 young adults from across the province pack into its well-worn stalls, with a scoop of Ben and Jerryís new fair trade Vanilla flavour ice-cream in one hand and popcorn in the other.

Following a jazz-band reception, tuxedo-clad ushers will show guests to their seats, where they will await the screening of the Academy Award-winning film The Constant Gardener.

This event will give ìtwenty-somethingsî the opportunity to ëwork a miracleí by enabling children in the developing world to have an HIV free start to life. The film, The Constant Gardener, is set in Kenya and highlights the reality of HIV and AIDS in the developing world. It affected the cast and crew to the extent that they set up the Constant Gardener Trust in order to provide basic education around the villages where they filmed.

Many churchgoers all over the province have already backed the appeal, raising funds and praying for those affected. Vic Simms said, ìMy husband and I are really pleased to be supporting Tearfundís Work a Miracle appeal this Christmas, even a small amount of money and prayer can make a difference to a childís start in life.î

A new film produced for Tearfund features Esther, a mother from Malawi who is living with HIV. Esther gave birth to her daughter Alinafe ten years ago on Christmas Day and she knows there is a risk that she may have transmitted HIV to her. Alinafe remains unaware of the danger. Alinafe doesnít know why her mother is sick sometimes. ìI donít want to tell her that I have HIV,î says Esther. ìWhen Iím ill, I tell her I might not get better. But it makes her so sad.î

'Work a Miracle' appeal launched to tackle HIV/AIDS

-01/12/06

Over 250 young adults in Northern Ireland will help Christian relief and development agency Tearfund launch their 'Work a Miracle' appeal at the Strand cinema, Belfast, today, World Aids day.

One in three infected mothers pass HIV on to their newborn child, yet it costs just £7 to pay for two doses of medicine which reduces this risk to 5% says the charity.

Tearfundís Work a Miracle Appeal aims to help women get access to medicines and information that will prevent their babies being born with HIV.

In his World AIDS Day appeal to local churches, Tim Magowan, Tearfundís Manager in Ireland Manager said, ìMoney canít buy miracles ñ we know that. But it can buy clinics, education, orphan care and training for the volunteers to provide counselling and testing. These few measures can go a long way to try and prevent a mother passing HIV to her child.î

Decked out in all its splendour, the Strand Cinema will re-live its heady days when more than 250 young adults from across the province pack into its well-worn stalls, with a scoop of Ben and Jerryís new fair trade Vanilla flavour ice-cream in one hand and popcorn in the other.

Following a jazz-band reception, tuxedo-clad ushers will show guests to their seats, where they will await the screening of the Academy Award-winning film The Constant Gardener.

This event will give ìtwenty-somethingsî the opportunity to ëwork a miracleí by enabling children in the developing world to have an HIV free start to life. The film, The Constant Gardener, is set in Kenya and highlights the reality of HIV and AIDS in the developing world. It affected the cast and crew to the extent that they set up the Constant Gardener Trust in order to provide basic education around the villages where they filmed.

Many churchgoers all over the province have already backed the appeal, raising funds and praying for those affected. Vic Simms said, ìMy husband and I are really pleased to be supporting Tearfundís Work a Miracle appeal this Christmas, even a small amount of money and prayer can make a difference to a childís start in life.î

A new film produced for Tearfund features Esther, a mother from Malawi who is living with HIV. Esther gave birth to her daughter Alinafe ten years ago on Christmas Day and she knows there is a risk that she may have transmitted HIV to her. Alinafe remains unaware of the danger. Alinafe doesnít know why her mother is sick sometimes. ìI donít want to tell her that I have HIV,î says Esther. ìWhen Iím ill, I tell her I might not get better. But it makes her so sad.î

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