The latest news from ekklesia on theology and politics from a christian perspective

The latest news from ekklesia on theology and politics from a christian perspective

By staff writers
18 Mar 2003

Bishops face EU clash over sexuality

-18/3/2003

Bishops could face prosecution if they refuse to ordain practising homosexuals reports The Daily Telegraph.

The action could be taken under new laws forbidding discrimination on grounds of sexual orientation.

The draft regulations have been drawn up to meet Britain's obligations under an EU directive outlawing discrimination against homosexuals, lesbians and bisexuals.

But the Church of England has said that they could lead to a "fundamental" clash between the law and religious belief when the regulations are implemented in December.

In a firmly-worded submission to the Government, the Archbishops of Canterbury and York demanded that the Church be granted exemptions and called for meetings with senior ministers.

The Church leaders said that it was "crucial" that the regulations did not encroach on the "freedom which all religious organisations must have to set and enforce their own conduct rules in relation to those who work for and represent them".

They added: "Churches and other faith-based organisations must not find themselves in a position where the law of the land is preventing them from conscientiously applying their own sincerely held doctrines and beliefs on moral issues."

But the Rev Richard Kirker, the general secretary of the Lesbian and Gay Christian Movement, said: "The Government proposals are to be applauded since they demonstrate a greater understanding of the Christian belief in the equality of all people than is shown by the Churches themselves."

Bishops could face prosecution if they refuse to ordain practising homosexuals reports The Daily Telegraph.

The action could be taken under new laws forbidding discrimination on grounds of sexual orientation.

The draft regulations have been drawn up to meet Britain's obligations under an EU directive outlawing discrimination against homosexuals, lesbians and bisexuals.

But the Church of England has said that they could lead to a "fundamental" clash between the law and religious belief when the regulations are implemented in December.

In a firmly-worded submission to the Government, the Archbishops of Canterbury and York demanded that the Church be granted exemptions and called for meetings with senior ministers.

The Church leaders said that it was "crucial" that the regulations did not encroach on the "freedom which all religious organisations must have to set and enforce their own conduct rules in relation to those who work for and represent them".

They added: "Churches and other faith-based organisations must not find themselves in a position where the law of the land is preventing them from conscientiously applying their own sincerely held doctrines and beliefs on moral issues."

But the Rev Richard Kirker, the general secretary of the Lesbian and Gay Christian Movement, said: "The Government proposals are to be applauded since they demonstrate a greater understanding of the Christian belief in the equality of all people than is shown by the Churches themselves."

Bishops face EU clash over sexuality

-18/3/2003

Bishops could face prosecution if they refuse to ordain practising homosexuals reports The Daily Telegraph.

The action could be taken under new laws forbidding discrimination on grounds of sexual orientation.

The draft regulations have been drawn up to meet Britain's obligations under an EU directive outlawing discrimination against homosexuals, lesbians and bisexuals.

But the Church of England has said that they could lead to a "fundamental" clash between the law and religious belief when the regulations are implemented in December.

In a firmly-worded submission to the Government, the Archbishops of Canterbury and York demanded that the Church be granted exemptions and called for meetings with senior ministers.

The Church leaders said that it was "crucial" that the regulations did not encroach on the "freedom which all religious organisations must have to set and enforce their own conduct rules in relation to those who work for and represent them".

They added: "Churches and other faith-based organisations must not find themselves in a position where the law of the land is preventing them from conscientiously applying their own sincerely held doctrines and beliefs on moral issues."

But the Rev Richard Kirker, the general secretary of the Lesbian and Gay Christian Movement, said: "The Government proposals are to be applauded since they demonstrate a greater understanding of the Christian belief in the equality of all people than is shown by the Churches themselves."

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