The latest news from ekklesia on theology and politics from a christian perspective

The latest news from ekklesia on theology and politics from a christian perspective

By staff writers
28 Feb 2003

Soldiers protest at civilian deaths

-31/3/2003

Three British soldiers face court martial after being ordered home from Iraq when they objected to the conduct of the war.

It is understood they have been sent home for protesting that the war is killing civilians reports the Guardian newspaper.

As yet their names have not been made public, so it is not known whether any of the soldiers has a Christian faith.

But Texan theologian Stanley Hauerwas has suggested that this is the sort of action that Christians in the military might take.

Saying that Christian soldiers should be the people most likely to worry their superiors he states; "Christians are asked to pray for the enemy. Could you trust people in your unit who think the enemy's life is as valid as their own or their fellow soldier? Could you trust someone who would think it more important to die than to kill unjustly? Are they fit for the military?"

The three soldiers - including a private and a technician - are from 16 Air Assault Brigade which is deployed in southern Iraq and based in Colchester, Essex. They are currently seeking legal advice, defence sources said yesterday.

Soldiers could be returned home for a number of reasons, including compassionate and medical, as well as disciplinary grounds, defence sources said. But it is understood that the three soldiers have been sent home for complaining about the way the war is being fought and the growing danger to civilians.

The fact that they are seeking legal advice also makes it clear they have been sent home for refusing to obey orders rather than because of any medical or related problems such as shell shock.

MoD lawyers were understood last night to be anxiously trying to discover the circumstances surrounding the order to send the soldiers home.

Soldiers protest at civilian deaths

-31/3/2003

Three British soldiers face court martial after being ordered home from Iraq when they objected to the conduct of the war.

It is understood they have been sent home for protesting that the war is killing civilians reports the Guardian newspaper.

As yet their names have not been made public, so it is not known whether any of the soldiers has a Christian faith.

But Texan theologian Stanley Hauerwas has suggested that this is the sort of action that Christians in the military might take.

Saying that Christian soldiers should be the people most likely to worry their superiors he states; "Christians are asked to pray for the enemy. Could you trust people in your unit who think the enemy's life is as valid as their own or their fellow soldier? Could you trust someone who would think it more important to die than to kill unjustly? Are they fit for the military?"

The three soldiers - including a private and a technician - are from 16 Air Assault Brigade which is deployed in southern Iraq and based in Colchester, Essex. They are currently seeking legal advice, defence sources said yesterday.

Soldiers could be returned home for a number of reasons, including compassionate and medical, as well as disciplinary grounds, defence sources said. But it is understood that the three soldiers have been sent home for complaining about the way the war is being fought and the growing danger to civilians.

The fact that they are seeking legal advice also makes it clear they have been sent home for refusing to obey orders rather than because of any medical or related problems such as shell shock.

MoD lawyers were understood last night to be anxiously trying to discover the circumstances surrounding the order to send the soldiers home.

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