Welcome for review of children's employment needs - news from ekklesia on theology and politics from a christian perspective

Welcome for review of children's employment needs - news from ekklesia on theology and politics from a christian perspective

By staff writers
10 Apr 2003

Welcome for review of children's employment needs

-10/4/03

The Children's Society has welcomed the announcement that the government is to undertake a review of training, pay and employment needs for 16 to 19 year olds.

The church-based society also said it hopes that the "discrimination" against this age group would now come to an end.

The study, announced by Gordon Brown in the Budget, will look at the case for 16 and 17-year-olds being covered by the minimum wage.

Dave Ely, policy manager at the Children's Society said; "For too long this group of young people, who contribute significantly to the economy, has been discriminated against. They pay taxes and should be protected by the same wages laws as everyone else."

"The lack of a minimum wage for this age group is particularly a problem for socially excluded young people who depend on this income. We would hope that young people will be invited to participate in the commission's review."

ìWe are pleased that the minimum wage is being increased from October, 2003, up to £4.50, and £4.85 from October 2004 for people aged over 22 and that those aged 18 to 21 will receive £3.80 from Oct, 2003, and £4.10 Oct 2004."

"But a more realistic minimum wage would be £6.30 for everyone aged over 22, and equivalent increases for those aged 18-22, in order to pull young people out of poverty."

Welcome for review of children's employment needs

-10/4/03

The Children's Society has welcomed the announcement that the government is to undertake a review of training, pay and employment needs for 16 to 19 year olds.

The church-based society also said it hopes that the "discrimination" against this age group would now come to an end.

The study, announced by Gordon Brown in the Budget, will look at the case for 16 and 17-year-olds being covered by the minimum wage.

Dave Ely, policy manager at the Children's Society said; "For too long this group of young people, who contribute significantly to the economy, has been discriminated against. They pay taxes and should be protected by the same wages laws as everyone else."

"The lack of a minimum wage for this age group is particularly a problem for socially excluded young people who depend on this income. We would hope that young people will be invited to participate in the commission's review."

ìWe are pleased that the minimum wage is being increased from October, 2003, up to £4.50, and £4.85 from October 2004 for people aged over 22 and that those aged 18 to 21 will receive £3.80 from Oct, 2003, and £4.10 Oct 2004."

"But a more realistic minimum wage would be £6.30 for everyone aged over 22, and equivalent increases for those aged 18-22, in order to pull young people out of poverty."

Creative Commons LicenseThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.0 England & Wales License. Although the views expressed in this article do not necessarily represent the views of Ekklesia, the article may reflect Ekklesia's values. If you use Ekklesia's news briefings please consider making a donation to sponsor Ekklesia's work here.