Professor: Exodus miracles explained by science on theology and politics from a christian perspective

Professor: Exodus miracles explained by science on theology and politics from a christian perspective

By staff writers
23 Apr 2003

Professor: Exodus miracles explained by science

-23/4/03

The miracles of the Biblical book of Exodus can be explained by science, according to a Cambridge University professor.

Professor Colin Humphreys claims in a new book that phenomena described in Exodus can be shown to have natural causes, which science can explain.

Although such a claim is not new, it brings a scientific rather than a theological perspective to bear, and will contribute to on-going debate.

The book, written by the Professor of Materials Science, called "The Miracles of Exodus", attempts scientific explanations for a number of miracles including the burning bush that was not consumed. It also tackles the 10 plagues of Egypt and the crossing of the Red Sea.

The Professor suggests that the parting of the Red Sea happened at the Gulf of Aqaba and was the result of a strong wind blowing water away from the coast.

He said: "This effect will happen with a long and narrow body of water."

"At Lake Erie in America, which is long and narrow, a strong wind will result in one end being up to 16 feet higher than the other end - simply due to the effect of it being blown by the wind."

"I've done the maths and the calculations for what would happen with a hurricane force wind of 80 mph in the Gulf of Aqaba."

"The water would be pushed out from the seashore and would create a wall of water about four or five feet tall and maybe 800 yards out to sea."

"Usually when you get a strong wind it dies down gradually but if it was to suddenly stop you could get a huge wall of water travelling at 16 feet per second which would explain how the Egyptians who were chasing the Israelites were drowned."

His book is currently available in the US from Harper Collins but will be on sale in the UK in July.

Professor: Exodus miracles explained by science

-23/4/03

The miracles of the Biblical book of Exodus can be explained by science, according to a Cambridge University professor.

Professor Colin Humphreys claims in a new book that phenomena described in Exodus can be shown to have natural causes, which science can explain.

Although such a claim is not new, it brings a scientific rather than a theological perspective to bear, and will contribute to on-going debate.

The book, written by the Professor of Materials Science, called "The Miracles of Exodus", attempts scientific explanations for a number of miracles including the burning bush that was not consumed. It also tackles the 10 plagues of Egypt and the crossing of the Red Sea.

The Professor suggests that the parting of the Red Sea happened at the Gulf of Aqaba and was the result of a strong wind blowing water away from the coast.

He said: "This effect will happen with a long and narrow body of water."

"At Lake Erie in America, which is long and narrow, a strong wind will result in one end being up to 16 feet higher than the other end - simply due to the effect of it being blown by the wind."

"I've done the maths and the calculations for what would happen with a hurricane force wind of 80 mph in the Gulf of Aqaba."

"The water would be pushed out from the seashore and would create a wall of water about four or five feet tall and maybe 800 yards out to sea."

"Usually when you get a strong wind it dies down gradually but if it was to suddenly stop you could get a huge wall of water travelling at 16 feet per second which would explain how the Egyptians who were chasing the Israelites were drowned."

His book is currently available in the US from Harper Collins but will be on sale in the UK in July.

Creative Commons LicenseThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.0 England & Wales License. Although the views expressed in this article do not necessarily represent the views of Ekklesia, the article may reflect Ekklesia's values. If you use Ekklesia's news briefings please consider making a donation to sponsor Ekklesia's work here.