The latest news from ekklesia on theology and politics from a christian perspective

The latest news from ekklesia on theology and politics from a christian perspective

By staff writers
13 May 2003

MPs highlight third world debt

-13/5/03

Campaigners against Third World debt are today set to join with MPs in a bid to highlight the need for further action by Western governments.

MPs from all three political parties will be addressing one of the key issues on the political agenda in the wake of the international development secretary's decision to quit the government.

The Jubilee Debt Campaign and the World Development Movement have organised a handicapped hurdle race for MPs.

Competitors are to race down a track while carrying sacks representing the debts that developing countries have to pay and overcoming hurdles representing the policies of the IMF and World Bank.

Among those expected to take part are Oona King, Barbara Follett, Caroline Spelman and Paul Burstow.

The MPs gathering on Westminster's College Green will be hoping that while the media focus is on international development they can highlight the issue of debt ahead of next month's G8 meeting in France.

Julia Drown, Labour chairman of the all party group on heavily indebted poor countries, said MPs across the Commons wanted to see change on the issue.

"The argument for more effective, greater and faster debt relief has been well made. We are sending a clear visual message that debt relief plays a crucial role in allowing poor countries to achieve the Millennium Development Goals that the international community has signed up to," she said.

"The message to world leaders meeting next month in France is that we want them to sit down and sort out, once and for all, an end to the debt crisis."

Almost five years ago to the day, 70 000 people travelled to Birmingham to tell the leaders of the G8 who were meeting there, that Third World Debt was unjust.

In a few days time, campaigners are returning to Birmingham, with many others, to remind the G8 leaders that the debt is still unjust and 80% remains to be cancelled.

MPs highlight third world debt

-13/5/03

Campaigners against Third World debt are today set to join with MPs in a bid to highlight the need for further action by Western governments.

MPs from all three political parties will be addressing one of the key issues on the political agenda in the wake of the international development secretary's decision to quit the government.

The Jubilee Debt Campaign and the World Development Movement have organised a handicapped hurdle race for MPs.

Competitors are to race down a track while carrying sacks representing the debts that developing countries have to pay and overcoming hurdles representing the policies of the IMF and World Bank.

Among those expected to take part are Oona King, Barbara Follett, Caroline Spelman and Paul Burstow.

The MPs gathering on Westminster's College Green will be hoping that while the media focus is on international development they can highlight the issue of debt ahead of next month's G8 meeting in France.

Julia Drown, Labour chairman of the all party group on heavily indebted poor countries, said MPs across the Commons wanted to see change on the issue.

"The argument for more effective, greater and faster debt relief has been well made. We are sending a clear visual message that debt relief plays a crucial role in allowing poor countries to achieve the Millennium Development Goals that the international community has signed up to," she said.

"The message to world leaders meeting next month in France is that we want them to sit down and sort out, once and for all, an end to the debt crisis."

Almost five years ago to the day, 70 000 people travelled to Birmingham to tell the leaders of the G8 who were meeting there, that Third World Debt was unjust.

In a few days time, campaigners are returning to Birmingham, with many others, to remind the G8 leaders that the debt is still unjust and 80% remains to be cancelled.

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