news from ekklesia

news from ekklesia

By staff writers
6 Oct 2003

Call for papers on political theology

-6/10/03

The international journal Political Theology has issued a call for papers that explore significant political events, personalities and policies as well as the presuppositions of philosophical commitments and projects.

Political Theology, which resources and promotes theological engagement with mainstream political life, brings together theology, political theory and cultural studies to analyse the complex landscape of politics.

It aims to demonstrate the mutually beneficial interaction of theological reflection and political and cultural discourses.

The journal is currently looking for articles in the two areas of the future of democracy and the role of religion in the twenty first century.

Areas that it is seeking to address include whether democracy is the best system of government available today and if it is working.

Covering such areas as the historic relationship between democracy and Christianity, it is also looking for contributions that look at whether Christians should support and defend democratic values and principles and whether it matters who Christians vote for in a democratic election.

In a second area, the journal also wants to examine whether the 21st century is shaping up to be the "religious century".

With an emphasis on the relationship between national, cultural and religious identity and how it impacts on political events, it is asking for contributions that look at the ways in which political crises are an expression of conflict between religious and cultural identities. Specifically, it is asking people to look at whether fundamentalist religion will play a significant part in political life.

Articles should be 5000ñ8000 words and sent to the editors by 1st March 2004.

Articles can be sent via email as Word or .rtf attachments to the editors:

Graeme Smith g.r.smith@route56.co.uk

Alison Webster alison.webster@oxford.anglican.org

Tim Simpson tfsimpson@comcast.net.

Call for papers on political theology

-6/10/03

The international journal Political Theology has issued a call for papers that explore significant political events, personalities and policies as well as the presuppositions of philosophical commitments and projects.

Political Theology, which resources and promotes theological engagement with mainstream political life, brings together theology, political theory and cultural studies to analyse the complex landscape of politics.

It aims to demonstrate the mutually beneficial interaction of theological reflection and political and cultural discourses.

The journal is currently looking for articles in the two areas of the future of democracy and the role of religion in the twenty first century.

Areas that it is seeking to address include whether democracy is the best system of government available today and if it is working.

Covering such areas as the historic relationship between democracy and Christianity, it is also looking for contributions that look at whether Christians should support and defend democratic values and principles and whether it matters who Christians vote for in a democratic election.

In a second area, the journal also wants to examine whether the 21st century is shaping up to be the "religious century".

With an emphasis on the relationship between national, cultural and religious identity and how it impacts on political events, it is asking for contributions that look at the ways in which political crises are an expression of conflict between religious and cultural identities. Specifically, it is asking people to look at whether fundamentalist religion will play a significant part in political life.

Articles should be 5000ñ8000 words and sent to the editors by 1st March 2004.

Articles can be sent via email as Word or .rtf attachments to the editors:

Graeme Smith g.r.smith@route56.co.uk

Alison Webster alison.webster@oxford.anglican.org

Tim Simpson tfsimpson@comcast.net.

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