news from ekklesia

news from ekklesia

By staff writers
8 Dec 2003

Trade Justice Campaigners plan week of action

-8/12/03

Trade justice campaigners who gathered for an international conference in Delhi at the end of November have decided to launch a global "People's Week of Action" for Trade Justice in April 2005.

This will be a few months before the G8 meets in the UK and before the next WTO meeting in Hong Kong.

Activists from more than 50 countries gathered in Delhi to increase the momentum of their campaign to make international trade rules work for the poor.

The planned Week of Action will take place across the world, but will place particular focus on the role of the UK and other rich-country governments.

Current trade rules work against the poor with different results across the world. In Senegal and Ghana, for example, farmers are struggling to make a living because imported US rice is flooding their local markets. During the week of action, campaigners will lobby their governments to change international trade rules.

Christian Aid, which helped to coordinate the Delhi conference, is pleased with the results.

"The enthusiasm and energy with which those at the conference took to the idea of joint campaigning across the world was incredible," said Martin Gordon, international campaign manager.

"I think we could really see a significant shift towards international trade rules in favour of the poor."

The conference ended with each participant pledging to take this call to action back to their own networks - which could reach well many more than 100 million people if everyone takes part.

More details will emerge at the 4th World Social Forum in Bombay in January 2004, where over 100,000 campaigners are expected to meet.

Trade Justice Campaigners plan week of action

-8/12/03

Trade justice campaigners who gathered for an international conference in Delhi at the end of November have decided to launch a global "People's Week of Action" for Trade Justice in April 2005.

This will be a few months before the G8 meets in the UK and before the next WTO meeting in Hong Kong.

Activists from more than 50 countries gathered in Delhi to increase the momentum of their campaign to make international trade rules work for the poor.

The planned Week of Action will take place across the world, but will place particular focus on the role of the UK and other rich-country governments.

Current trade rules work against the poor with different results across the world. In Senegal and Ghana, for example, farmers are struggling to make a living because imported US rice is flooding their local markets. During the week of action, campaigners will lobby their governments to change international trade rules.

Christian Aid, which helped to coordinate the Delhi conference, is pleased with the results.

"The enthusiasm and energy with which those at the conference took to the idea of joint campaigning across the world was incredible," said Martin Gordon, international campaign manager.

"I think we could really see a significant shift towards international trade rules in favour of the poor."

The conference ended with each participant pledging to take this call to action back to their own networks - which could reach well many more than 100 million people if everyone takes part.

More details will emerge at the 4th World Social Forum in Bombay in January 2004, where over 100,000 campaigners are expected to meet.

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