news from ekklesia

news from ekklesia

By staff writers
21 Jan 2004

IDS says Tories did not understand compassion agenda

-21/1/04

Iain Duncan Smith has accused his parliamentary colleagues of failing to understand his "social justice" agenda.

The former Conservative leader made clear his anger at the way he was ousted last October in an interview with the relaunch edition of Briefing, the official magazine of Roman Catholic bishops published on Thursday.

Defending the emphasis he placed during his two years as leader on developing policies aimed at the poorest in society he complained that trying to persuade his colleagues to share his interest in social justice was "like shining a pencil torch into a dark void".

The ìcompassionate conservatismî theme that he persued as Tory leader was one backed by Christians within the party including the Conservative Christian Fellowship.

The MP for Chingford and Woodford Green, who has kept a low profile since being forced to resign after losing a vote of confidence, attacked those who opposed him as "bullies" and insisted they had failed to humiliate him.

He pledged support for Michael Howard but, in what will be interpreted as a veiled criticism of his successor, he warned his colleagues not to settle for a "comfort blanket" that would satisfy the demands of the media.

He said he would continue to campaign for politicians and journalists to pay more attention to people in deprived areas who felt cut off from Westminster.

IDS says Tories did not understand compassion agenda

-21/1/04

Iain Duncan Smith has accused his parliamentary colleagues of failing to understand his "social justice" agenda.

The former Conservative leader made clear his anger at the way he was ousted last October in an interview with the relaunch edition of Briefing, the official magazine of Roman Catholic bishops published on Thursday.

Defending the emphasis he placed during his two years as leader on developing policies aimed at the poorest in society he complained that trying to persuade his colleagues to share his interest in social justice was "like shining a pencil torch into a dark void".

The ìcompassionate conservatismî theme that he persued as Tory leader was one backed by Christians within the party including the Conservative Christian Fellowship.

The MP for Chingford and Woodford Green, who has kept a low profile since being forced to resign after losing a vote of confidence, attacked those who opposed him as "bullies" and insisted they had failed to humiliate him.

He pledged support for Michael Howard but, in what will be interpreted as a veiled criticism of his successor, he warned his colleagues not to settle for a "comfort blanket" that would satisfy the demands of the media.

He said he would continue to campaign for politicians and journalists to pay more attention to people in deprived areas who felt cut off from Westminster.

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