news from ekklesia

news from ekklesia

By staff writers
23 Jan 2004

Actors get behind report on social responsibility

-23/1/04

Actors ZoÎ Wanamaker CBE and Juliet Stevenson, as well as poet Benjamin Zephaniah have joined the chorus of approval for Christian Aid's latest report.

Behind the Mask, published this week, calls for legally binding regulation to lessen the damaging impact companies can have in an increasingly globalised world.

Olivier Award-winning actress ZoÎ Wanamaker said: "This report argues that every company should be obliged to the same worldwide, environmental and social standards. Right now, it seems many companies get away with lower standards in poorer countries. Christian Aid is rightly insisting on regulation to force the companies to live up to their rhetoric."

Benjamin Zephaniah, the poet who is on Channel 4's shortlist for their Political Figure of the Year Award, is another supporter.

"If governments really cared they would make sure that companies made good on their promises," he said.

"This is a matter of life and death, so there should be laws to ensure companies meet high social and environmental standards."

"Christian Aid is right to argue for an international set of standards so that poor countries have the same level of corporate behaviour. That's why I'm with Christian Aid."

Juliet Stevenson, who has also won an Olivier, as well as starring in hit films Bend It Like Beckham, Emma and Truly Madly Deeply, also lent support.

"The world's poorest countries deserve better than empty rhetoric from the multinationals. They must keep their promises. I support Christian Aid's campaign to ensure corporate social responsibility is backed by law," she said.

The three have made the news recently. The poet recently attracted publicity for turning down an OBE. ZoÎ Wanamaker, having acquired legions of young fans with her appearance in the Harry Potter films, is currently working on the latest series of My Family. It finished 24th in the BBC's January poll for the Best British Sitcom, beating The Office and I'm Alan Partridge. And Juliet Stevenson starred in a TV drama on Five last month about the controversial MMR vaccinations, Hear the Silence.

Actors get behind report on social responsibility

-23/1/04

Actors ZoÎ Wanamaker CBE and Juliet Stevenson, as well as poet Benjamin Zephaniah have joined the chorus of approval for Christian Aid's latest report.

Behind the Mask, published this week, calls for legally binding regulation to lessen the damaging impact companies can have in an increasingly globalised world.

Olivier Award-winning actress ZoÎ Wanamaker said: "This report argues that every company should be obliged to the same worldwide, environmental and social standards. Right now, it seems many companies get away with lower standards in poorer countries. Christian Aid is rightly insisting on regulation to force the companies to live up to their rhetoric."

Benjamin Zephaniah, the poet who is on Channel 4's shortlist for their Political Figure of the Year Award, is another supporter.

"If governments really cared they would make sure that companies made good on their promises," he said.

"This is a matter of life and death, so there should be laws to ensure companies meet high social and environmental standards."

"Christian Aid is right to argue for an international set of standards so that poor countries have the same level of corporate behaviour. That's why I'm with Christian Aid."

Juliet Stevenson, who has also won an Olivier, as well as starring in hit films Bend It Like Beckham, Emma and Truly Madly Deeply, also lent support.

"The world's poorest countries deserve better than empty rhetoric from the multinationals. They must keep their promises. I support Christian Aid's campaign to ensure corporate social responsibility is backed by law," she said.

The three have made the news recently. The poet recently attracted publicity for turning down an OBE. ZoÎ Wanamaker, having acquired legions of young fans with her appearance in the Harry Potter films, is currently working on the latest series of My Family. It finished 24th in the BBC's January poll for the Best British Sitcom, beating The Office and I'm Alan Partridge. And Juliet Stevenson starred in a TV drama on Five last month about the controversial MMR vaccinations, Hear the Silence.

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