news from ekklesia

news from ekklesia

By staff writers
23 Jan 2004

World foru ends with call for non-violent struggle

-23/1/04

The World Social Forum has ended in Mumbai with a call to use "people's power" to counter the consequences of globalisation by learning from Mahatma Gandhi who used non-violent struggle to lead India to independence from Britain.

"To fight globalisation, you need to fight the way Mahatma Gandhi fought with the strength of the masses. People's power is a new factor in international politics," India's former president Kocheril Raman Narayanan told tens of thousands of people at the closing ceremony in Mumbai.

The Forum was hailed as a "big success".

"Government leaders and businesses around the world are watching us more than they did before," said Luis Eduardo Galio of Brazil's National Confederation of Liberal Professions.

100 000 people from 132 countries gathered in Mumbai, for what was meant to be a counterpoint to the World Economic Forum, a summit of political and business leaders at the Swiss alpine resort of Davos, which began on Wednesday.

Globalisation's opponents "have got their criticism right," former United States president Bill Clinton told business leaders on the opening day of the Davos forum.

"There are lots of wonderful people who are dealing with the rough edges of globalisation, but we do not have the systems the world needs to respond in a comprehensive way," he said, referring to the Mumbai forum.

World foru ends with call for non-violent struggle

-23/1/04

The World Social Forum has ended in Mumbai with a call to use "people's power" to counter the consequences of globalisation by learning from Mahatma Gandhi who used non-violent struggle to lead India to independence from Britain.

"To fight globalisation, you need to fight the way Mahatma Gandhi fought with the strength of the masses. People's power is a new factor in international politics," India's former president Kocheril Raman Narayanan told tens of thousands of people at the closing ceremony in Mumbai.

The Forum was hailed as a "big success".

"Government leaders and businesses around the world are watching us more than they did before," said Luis Eduardo Galio of Brazil's National Confederation of Liberal Professions.

100 000 people from 132 countries gathered in Mumbai, for what was meant to be a counterpoint to the World Economic Forum, a summit of political and business leaders at the Swiss alpine resort of Davos, which began on Wednesday.

Globalisation's opponents "have got their criticism right," former United States president Bill Clinton told business leaders on the opening day of the Davos forum.

"There are lots of wonderful people who are dealing with the rough edges of globalisation, but we do not have the systems the world needs to respond in a comprehensive way," he said, referring to the Mumbai forum.

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