news from ekklesia

news from ekklesia

By staff writers
8 Jan 2004

World vision partners with local NGOs in earthquake zone

-8/1/04

Christian relief agency World Vision has completed the hand over of tents, soap, plastic sheeting and water containers to Iranian NGO Jari (Help) to disburse to earthquake-hit families in Bam.

World Vision Relief Director Ton van Zutphen said it was encouraging that local NGOs were approaching World Vision to work in partnership, indicating they had confidence in the organisation.

Jari is part of the Hamiar group ñ an association of seven Iranian NGOs working on earthquake relief in Bam.

Jari relief manager Ahmad Taheri said most of the commodities would be delivered in the Arab Khaneh district on the south side of the city.

He said the population of Arab Khaneh had dwindled from about 15,000 to 4,000. Those who remained tended to have lost all their assets in the quake and had no means to move to other locations in Iran.

ìThey donít feel great but somehow most are managing to cope,î he said.

In addition to the commodities supplied by World Vision, Mr Taheri said food and sanitation were also big problems. Hamiar had distributed tins of tuna in the district in an effort to alleviate the situation.

Jari began distributing the World Vision commodities yesterday afternoon. One beneficiary Ali Tajabadi, 63, said 23 members of his family had been forced to live in a tent designed for 16, until World Vision supplied his family with a second tent.

In addition he was supplied with plastic sheeting to cover some of his salvaged possessions and keep them protected from the weather.

Altogether World Vision supplied Jari with 2,000 blankets, 20 tents, 1,000 collapsible water containers, 1,500 pieces of plastic sheeting and 1,000 pieces of soap.

World Vision is also moving ahead to facilitate schooling for the many children. World Vision has donated 30 mint coloured tents to different communities in and around Bam. More than 3,200 boy and girls now can resume their schooling activities.

"We miss our school. We miss our friends. We miss our teachers," brothers Abbari (11) and Moieen (8) Masoud told World Vision during an assessment tour through the city. They were standing in front of their school that has been completely destroyed by the earthquake.

World Vision will continue with its humanitarian aid programmes during the upcoming three to six months. The focus will be on aid that chiefly benefits children and child protective issues. "We are very happy about how things are going. Especially about the cooperation between government agents and World Vision," says Ton van Zutphen, World Vision relief director.

World vision partners with local NGOs in earthquake zone

-8/1/04

Christian relief agency World Vision has completed the hand over of tents, soap, plastic sheeting and water containers to Iranian NGO Jari (Help) to disburse to earthquake-hit families in Bam.

World Vision Relief Director Ton van Zutphen said it was encouraging that local NGOs were approaching World Vision to work in partnership, indicating they had confidence in the organisation.

Jari is part of the Hamiar group ñ an association of seven Iranian NGOs working on earthquake relief in Bam.

Jari relief manager Ahmad Taheri said most of the commodities would be delivered in the Arab Khaneh district on the south side of the city.

He said the population of Arab Khaneh had dwindled from about 15,000 to 4,000. Those who remained tended to have lost all their assets in the quake and had no means to move to other locations in Iran.

ìThey donít feel great but somehow most are managing to cope,î he said.

In addition to the commodities supplied by World Vision, Mr Taheri said food and sanitation were also big problems. Hamiar had distributed tins of tuna in the district in an effort to alleviate the situation.

Jari began distributing the World Vision commodities yesterday afternoon. One beneficiary Ali Tajabadi, 63, said 23 members of his family had been forced to live in a tent designed for 16, until World Vision supplied his family with a second tent.

In addition he was supplied with plastic sheeting to cover some of his salvaged possessions and keep them protected from the weather.

Altogether World Vision supplied Jari with 2,000 blankets, 20 tents, 1,000 collapsible water containers, 1,500 pieces of plastic sheeting and 1,000 pieces of soap.

World Vision is also moving ahead to facilitate schooling for the many children. World Vision has donated 30 mint coloured tents to different communities in and around Bam. More than 3,200 boy and girls now can resume their schooling activities.

"We miss our school. We miss our friends. We miss our teachers," brothers Abbari (11) and Moieen (8) Masoud told World Vision during an assessment tour through the city. They were standing in front of their school that has been completely destroyed by the earthquake.

World Vision will continue with its humanitarian aid programmes during the upcoming three to six months. The focus will be on aid that chiefly benefits children and child protective issues. "We are very happy about how things are going. Especially about the cooperation between government agents and World Vision," says Ton van Zutphen, World Vision relief director.

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