news from ekklesia

news from ekklesia

By staff writers
11 Mar 2004

Clergy and politicians plead for Kurds

-11/3/04

Church leaders, politicians and race campaigners have called on the Home Office to allow three Kurdish failed asylum seekers to remain in the UK or otherwise stand by and watch them die.

Supporters of the hunger strikers, from Iran, who stitched up their mouths three weeks ago, claim the men will face death rather than deportation.

Yesterday, John Swinney, the SNP leader, visited Fariborz Gravindi, 30, Mokhtar Haydary, 34, and Faroq Haidari, 32, at their temporary bed-sit home in Langside.

Afterwards, Mr Swinney said: "These are desperate people facing a terrible fate if they are returned to Iran.

The Home Office has to reconsider their rejection of the hunger strikersí asylum claim. Ordinary human compassion demands it."

Last week, Mr Gravindi and Mr Haydary were taken to the cityís Victoria Infirmary after losing consciousness, but discharged themselves after refusing treatment.

Dr Dara Taff, the chairman of the Kurdish Cultural Association, in Glasgow, said:

"They are determined to go ahead with this, although it is a very difficult decision for them as there is a limit to what the human body can suffer."

Joseph Devine, the Bishop of Motherwell, joined with the Scottish Socialist Party in calling for the Scottish Executive to intervene.

However, a spokesman for the Executive insisted asylum issues remained a matter for the Home Office.

Clergy and politicians plead for Kurds

-11/3/04

Church leaders, politicians and race campaigners have called on the Home Office to allow three Kurdish failed asylum seekers to remain in the UK or otherwise stand by and watch them die.

Supporters of the hunger strikers, from Iran, who stitched up their mouths three weeks ago, claim the men will face death rather than deportation.

Yesterday, John Swinney, the SNP leader, visited Fariborz Gravindi, 30, Mokhtar Haydary, 34, and Faroq Haidari, 32, at their temporary bed-sit home in Langside.

Afterwards, Mr Swinney said: "These are desperate people facing a terrible fate if they are returned to Iran.

The Home Office has to reconsider their rejection of the hunger strikersí asylum claim. Ordinary human compassion demands it."

Last week, Mr Gravindi and Mr Haydary were taken to the cityís Victoria Infirmary after losing consciousness, but discharged themselves after refusing treatment.

Dr Dara Taff, the chairman of the Kurdish Cultural Association, in Glasgow, said:

"They are determined to go ahead with this, although it is a very difficult decision for them as there is a limit to what the human body can suffer."

Joseph Devine, the Bishop of Motherwell, joined with the Scottish Socialist Party in calling for the Scottish Executive to intervene.

However, a spokesman for the Executive insisted asylum issues remained a matter for the Home Office.

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