Category - critical religion

  • 13 Dec 2013

    Critical Religion at the University of Stirling is among the subject areas offering Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) Doctoral Awards under the Doctoral Training Partnership Scotland schemes in the Arts and Humanities.

  • 11 Aug 2013

    In the early run-up to the 2014 Scottish independence referendum, fear and chauvinism have often defeated creative and inspirational 'constructivist' approaches, suggests Dr Michael Marten of the University of Stirling. But there are also examples of the reverse happening. In a detailed examination of the emerging political terrain, he looks at how the competing discourses are faring, and where the room for more imaginative approaches is emerging.

  • 5 Aug 2013

    Twenty years ago, many public commentators believed that religion was dead, or at least 'on the way out'. How wrong that proved. Simon Barrow looks at how the conversation about faith is deepening and broadening in the face of growing religious and non-religious diversity.

  • 27 Jan 2013

    What sort of work can any academic department achieve when it is fenced into a little box with no room to manoeuvre of its own accord? Jonathan Tuckett, who is doing research in phenomenology at the University of Stirling, asks the question with regard to an appraisal of issues and dilemmas related to the Research Excellence Framework (REF) and the culture of - often imprecise - measurement and categorisation increasingly imposed upon universities and colleges.

  • 24 Dec 2012

    The critical religion school has taught us to see the colonial invention of world religions and their relegation to private space, says Alex Henley from the University of Manchester. But an emphasis on the bulldozing force of secular colonial power may obscure the resilience of local histories. This article is a reflection on a recent workshop discussion with Professor Ahmed Ragab and Dr Aria Nakissa at Harvard’s Center for Middle Eastern Studies.

  • 18 Dec 2012

    What are some of the implications of the discussion of critical religion for feminist and gender theory making? The gendered binaries of spiritual/material or spirit/flesh still haunt us, says Dr Alison Jasper, in the tendency to regard women and the female as better fitted for certain roles that tend to be less well rewarded in terms of money and influence.

  • 18 Dec 2012

    It is widely acknowledged among those who still care that academia in the UK is in very serious trouble, says Dr Michael Marten from the University of Stirling. The most infamous embodiment of the current malaise is a mechanism imposed upon universities by successive Westminster governments: a system of ‘research assessment’ driven by an ideology of neo-liberal commodification. Alternative perspectives and mechanisms are badly needed, he says.

  • 3 Dec 2012

    The work of scholars in critical religion may indeed concentrate on the semantics of 'religion', but this is far from being 'merely' an academic issue, points out Gabrielle Desmarais from the University of Ottawa. The meaning of the word 'religion' and the language used to regulate that definition are at the forefront of a range of constitutional cases about new religious movements.

  • 3 Dec 2012

    In today's world we face a vast range of human practices which are overlapping and do not function as religious or secular solely or discreetly, says Francis Stewart. He illustrates this in relation to his extensive research into punk music.

  • 2 Dec 2012

    Eighty people came to Glasgow University Chapel for the launch of two important new books on religion on 21 November 2012.