Category - critical religion

  • August 21, 2015

    The University of Stirling’s plans to close its globally-recognised teaching and research on religion in contemporary society is causing widespread concern.

  • August 20, 2015

    The New York Times published a horrific story by Rukmini Callimachi on 13.

  • August 20, 2015

    A Scottish university with an important track record of independent, critical enquiry on the impact of religion is planning to scrap its pioneering religion department.

  • August 11, 2015

    My ‘critical religion’ article entitled Critical reflections on the category of “Religion” in contemporary sociological discourse>/em> has recently been published by Nordic Journal of Religion

  • June 8, 2015

    Issues surrounding the “disenchantment” of language in modern times are complex, writes Melanie Barbato from Ludwig Maximilians University. Shifts in how language is supposed to be used can tell a lot about power relations. But like other judgements that are called aesthetic, political, religious or rational, they are mingled with the myths we have come to hold true.

  • November 24, 2014

    [Picking up on the debate at Stirling University on 23.10.14, the introductory blog to this topic by Alison Jasper and John I’Anson, the contribution by Sarah Clark, and the first comment piece

  • April 26, 2014

    An important event on (Mis-)representing Cultures and Objects is taking place at the University of Stirling, Scotland, on 16 May 2014. It highlights issues and concerns touching on ethnography, culture and religion in a postcolonial context.

  • April 23, 2014

    My response to the debate about Christianity now raging across sections of the media is this: No, Britain is not a 'Christian country', but it is a country marked by the history and institutions of Christendom.

  • December 12, 2013

    Critical Religion at the University of Stirling is among the subject areas offering Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) Doctoral Awards under the Doctoral Training Partnership Scotland schemes in the Arts and Humanities.

  • August 11, 2013

    In the early run-up to the 2014 Scottish independence referendum, fear and chauvinism have often defeated creative and inspirational 'constructivist' approaches, suggests Dr Michael Marten of the University of Stirling. But there are also examples of the reverse happening. In a detailed examination of the emerging political terrain, he looks at how the competing discourses are faring, and where the room for more imaginative approaches is emerging.