Category - critical religion

  • May 17, 2012

    The question for us today is how, in the many Os we might draw, and in the many circles we form on a daily basis, we negotiate our way across the empty spaces and the deep chasms they inevitably bring into our view, says Dr Andrew Hass. Yet Giotto’s legacy is not all lost: he at least tells us that something, even if that something is a “nothing”, remains there for our creation.

  • May 17, 2012

    At the end of last month, the Critical Religion Research Group at the University of Stirling, with which Ekklesia works in partnership, hosted Professor Naomi Goldenberg from the University of Ottawa.

  • April 26, 2012

    Very frequently, discourse about religion - which, with the changes in perception taking place in the world over the past decade has come back onto the global and political agenda with great force - remains stuck in a series of un-enlightening polarities.

  • April 25, 2012

    Professor Naomi Goldenberg (University of Ottawa) gives her public lecture in London on Thursday 26 April 2012, as part of her short tour in Scotland and England.

  • April 21, 2012
  • April 21, 2012

    A radical religion scholar from Canada is coming to Britain this week, to contribute to developing debates about the place of religion in public life.

  • April 19, 2012

    Professor Naomi Goldenberg, from the Department of Classics and Religious Studies, University of Ottawa, is visiting Britain this coming week (21 – 28 April 2012) to give public and university addresses in Stirling, Aberdeen and London.

  • April 19, 2012

    Key aspects of Christian (and notably Christendom) tradition have been used to cement or justify women's oppression. But dismissing Christianity simply as something to be thankfully consigned to history means consigning all the achievements of women who have identified themselves as Christian alongside it, says Alison Jasper. From this perspective, all Christian women are victims if not collaborators. A rounder picture is needed.

  • April 10, 2012

    When governments are displaced they can persist within contemporary states as ‘religions’ that maintain their patriarchal origins and character, says Professor Naomi Goldenberg. Since women’s challenges to male domination have only met with some success in recent times within fairly contemporary forms of statecraft, if earlier states known as ‘religions’ are allowed too much authority over domains such as ‘the family’ or ‘the home,’ women will be the losers, she argues.

  • April 6, 2012

    Religion scholar Professor Naomi Goldenberg, who is visiting Britain in April 2012, here outlines her hypothesis that religions can be productively thought of as 'vestigial states'. She considers this to be one way of de-essentialising, demystifying and deconstructing the category of 'religion'.