Education and Culture

  • 28 May 2008

    Only a fortnight after releasing their debut album of plainchant, the Cistercian monks of Stift Heiligenkreuz in Austria have reached number one on the UK Classics charts and number nine in the pop, rock and and dance charts.

  • 27 May 2008

    Globalisation constructed as top-down control and the triumph of the powerful needs to be disrupted by a different and gentler logic, says Simon Barrow. But will we choose Pentecost or Babel?

  • 20 May 2008

    Autism campaigners around the world are urging church leaders and clergy to understand the complex needs of children and adults with autism after a Roman Catholic priest banned a boy with autism from his church

  • 15 May 2008

    The Kochhar Humanist Education Center (KHEC), which was launched yesterday by the American Humanist Association, is to develop a curriculum for the humanist equivalent of Sunday schools. This will include programs in ethics geared to serve the children of atheists, agnostics and freethinkers.

  • 14 May 2008
  • 14 May 2008

    The British Humanist Association (BHA) has called on the government to support the new report from Parliament’s Joint Committee on Human Rights which calls for children to be given the right to withdraw from worship in schools.

  • 14 May 2008

    In a move which belies the anger of some Christian groups complaining at the downgrading of religious imagery on British stamps, the Royal mail yesterday issued a set of ten stamps celebrating ten of Britain's historic cathedrals.

  • 12 May 2008

    A closer look at the Sri Lankan experience may throw some light on other situations where struggles supposedly based on ethnicity or religion turn out to be more complex – and where human rights are of critical importance, says Savi Hensman.

  • 10 May 2008

    Following the worldwide success of online social networking sites such as Facebook, MySpace and Bebo, the Roman Catholic Church is getting in on the act with a website which hopes to attract more than just the usual faithful.

  • 9 May 2008

    New technology has always played a part in religious polemics and in the sense of identity generated through the heated exchange of opinion, says Adam Darlage. Consider Luther and the Catholics, and also what we see happening in cyberspace today.