Education and Culture

  • 10 May 2008

    Following the worldwide success of online social networking sites such as Facebook, MySpace and Bebo, the Roman Catholic Church is getting in on the act with a website which hopes to attract more than just the usual faithful.

  • 9 May 2008

    New technology has always played a part in religious polemics and in the sense of identity generated through the heated exchange of opinion, says Adam Darlage. Consider Luther and the Catholics, and also what we see happening in cyberspace today.

  • 9 May 2008

    Taking its inspiration and content both from Dave Andrews’ most recent book Compassionate Community Work and the work of Livability (formerly the Shaftesbury Society) and Tearfund with churches in t

  • 8 May 2008

    An installation of sculptures responding to the horrors of war, particularly the ongoing war in Iraq, is on display at Union Theological Seminary in New York City until 16 May 2008. It is the work of priest and artist Thomas Faulkner.

  • 8 May 2008

    The Christian Aid book sale at St Andrew’s & St George’s Church in Edinburgh, Scotland, began its life on a very small scale in 1974 and has now become a national institution - the largest church development sale of its kind.

  • 28 Apr 2008

    In a message sent to all of Scotland's 500 Catholic parishes for the 42nd World Communications Day, Bishop Philip Tartaglia claims that "a fundamental disconnection between the provider and the consumer" has occurred in the media

  • 24 Apr 2008

    The Patron Saint of England (and a number of other countries) has been hailed a human rights campaigner by fellow activist Peter Tatchell - who backs ideas that his national day should be a public holiday celebrating dissent.

  • 22 Apr 2008

    Millions of dollars have been spent promoting Ben Stein’s creationist propaganda movie ‘Expelled: No Intelligence Allowed’ to conservative church groups, but that money would have been better spent on fact checkers, say its critics.

  • 22 Apr 2008
  • 22 Apr 2008

    Fundamentalism is a 20th-century invention, in many ways a response to the rapid social change brought about by modernity and global capitalism, says Giles Fraser. It is a perversion of religion, and in no way the real thing, let alone its 'heartbeat'.