People and Power

  • September 7, 2007

    If the Roman Catholic Rudy Giuliani is the next Republican candidate for US president, as seems likely, says Giles Fraser, it could well mark the beginnings of a historic GOP divorce from the religious right.

  • September 7, 2007

    There is a growing disconnect with the aspirations of people whose concerns are not adequately mapped by the narrow economic, political and social assumptions of the main political parties, says Simon Barrow. Are we moving into post-democracy?

  • September 7, 2007

    Recent stock market turmoils have disturbed the faith of financiers and scuppered the vulnerable, says Jonathan Bartley. Rather than accept that profit must always be the motivator, institutions can be built around alternative values.

  • September 7, 2007
  • September 7, 2007
  • September 7, 2007

    Preserving religious freedom, including the right to manifest diverse beliefs, is a cornerstone of an open, liberal and tolerant society, the C of E Archbishops’ Council says in its response to proposals for a Single Equality Bill. Others say the Church is being too defensive.

  • September 7, 2007

    The BBC is launching a new major TV programme called The Big Questions this weekend. Its aim is to move the discussion of diverse beliefs and ethics out of a narrow 'religion' bracket, and to respond creatively to the debates taking place in modern Britain.

  • September 7, 2007

    The social transformation of the world - alleviating poverty and disease, restoring human rights and religious freedom, bringing peace overcoming prejudice - can only come through spiritual revival, progressive evangelical Jim Wallis has said.

  • September 7, 2007

    Getting together round the fire and having a good nosh and natter is a great way to combat prejudice and social division, reckons ex-Cape Town Archbishop Desmond Tutu, who has just become patron of South Africa's Barbecue (Braai) Day.

  • September 5, 2007

    The United Kingdom’s asylum system is rigged to fail as many applicants as possible, says Peter Tatchell. It is unjust, chaotic and inhumane. Here he highlights the concerns and lets key witnesses speak for themselves - including a Churches' Commission for Racial Justice worker.