Religion and Society

  • 15 Nov 2007

    According to Indian government documents, Christians account for less than 10 percent of the population of the southern Karnataka state. But the proportion may be much higher because of the impact of caste and categorisation, research shows.

  • 14 Nov 2007

    Religious organisations already have a major stake in the global economy and can now shift decisively towards using their resources for ethical purposes and to redistribute wealth to the poor, a major group of faith investors says.

  • 14 Nov 2007

    Among a vocal minority of those for whom religion is at best irrelevant and at worse an anathema, there is confusion about why government pays so much attention to faith groups.

  • 13 Nov 2007

    The Metropolitan Police have signed a deal with a US company to provide them with a introductory course about Islam. Jones Knowledge Group announced yesterday that it was to bring its new course 'Understanding Islam: An Introduction' to police officers.

  • 13 Nov 2007

    After four days of meetings, some 240 leaders of a broad range of churches, confessions and interchurch organizations from over 70 countries agreed to carry forward what they call "the Global Christian Forum process" - an open dialogue platform.

  • 13 Nov 2007

    The Global Christian Forum meeting in Limuru, Kenya, which has been hailed as the most representative conference of its kind ever held, has issued a message of unity and justice to churches throughout the world at the end of its proceedings.

  • 13 Nov 2007

    The Czech government has agreed, after almost two decades of dispute, to compensate churches for properties confiscated under communist rule, and also to make them financially independent from the state. The details are being sorted.

  • 13 Nov 2007

    Among secular groups there is puzzlement and annoyance that government continues to 'pander' to weakened churches in areas like public service provision. This is because, says Jonathan Bartley, they have not grasped the mutual interests involved. These are as much a threat to the churches as an advantage.

  • 13 Nov 2007

    Both fundamentalist believers and hardline anti-theists say that the Bible is a declaration of dogma that must either be accepted or rejected wholesale.

  • 13 Nov 2007

    Parallels between civil wars and the escalating crisis within American Anglicanism are now being made, says Giles Fraser. Issues of truth and justice cannot be suppressed by a false and forced kind of unity.