Peace and War

  • 4 Dec 2014

    What would it mean for churches to be places where people “learned how not to kill” – to stop viewing killing as a solution, and to start investing in nonviolent alternatives to war? How could they do this? What would it say about their witness? How would it impact how the voice of the church is heard at times of heightened conflict or war?

  • 2 Dec 2014

    Quakers in Britain are responding to the recently escalating cycles of violence and retribution in Palestine and Israel, with a new initiative to support those seeking peace.

  • 28 Nov 2014

    New government figures collated by CAAT show that the UK approved £7 million worth of military licences to Israel during the six months prior to the recent bombing of Gaza.

  • 27 Nov 2014

    A Foreign Affairs Committee report published today (27 November) criticises the government for “set[ting] a dangerous precedent” in its public position on drones.

  • 26 Nov 2014

    For all those who attended our proactively titled ‘Who Would Jesus Shoot?’ public debate on war and nonviolence – we are planning follow-up discussion on line, both here and on Ekklesia's Facebook group. All material will be linked here: http://www.ekklesia.co.uk/whowouldjesusshoot

  • 21 Nov 2014

    I had the privilege last week of speaking at Exeter University Debating Society, opposing the motion that “This house believes that World War One was a great British victory.” I am pleased to say that those present voted against the motion by seventy votes to forty.

  • 18 Nov 2014

    The Blood Swept Land and Seas of Red installation is gone from the Tower of London. The disputes over white poppies and the British Legion's misuse of Eric Bogle's 'Green Fields of France' have died away. But in this centenary year of the start of the first World War, there is much remembering – both honest and contrived – still to be done.

  • 15 Nov 2014

    The belief that violence “saves” is so successful because it doesn’t seem to be mythic in the least. Violence simply appears to be the nature of things. It’s what works. It seems inevitable, the last and, often, the first resort in conflicts, says the late Professor Walter Wink. If a god is what you turn to when all else fails, violence certainly functions as a god. What people overlook, then, is the religious character of violence. It demands from its devotees an absolute obedience-unto-death. It requires a theological critique.

  • 14 Nov 2014

    Former Archbishop of Canterbury Dr Rowan Williams will give the keynote speech at the Centenary Conference of the Fellowship of Reconciliation (FoR).

  • 14 Nov 2014

    Is the Jerusalem that we all claim to love not bigger than ego-politics, self-interest or self-aggrandisement, asks Ekklesia associate and regional expert Dr Harry Hagopian, surveying the fate of the city. We are all held hostage to ego-politics that negate win-win solutions. Yet, such win-win solutions alone can resolve this conflict. Walls or fences cannot protect a whole people. Nor can military might, religious radicalism and extremism. What is critical is the elusive good will that facilitates peace.