Economy and Politics

  • 12 May 2011

    The government's ability to keep its promises on disability has been rated as a 'D-' by the disability charity Scope.

  • 11 May 2011

    The difficulties negotiated and the sacrifices made by many disabled and ill people in getting to London to join the Hardest Hit march against government cuts has been inspiring.

  • 11 May 2011

    Today (11 May 2011) Ekklesia is highlighting the contents of a research paper which maps out the contours of the government's revolution in Britain’s benefits and welfare system - one that hits the mo

  • 11 May 2011
  • 11 May 2011

    The Government plans to cut billions from support for disabled people and their families. Indeed, swingeing reductions, made worse by the 'economies' being imposed on and by local council, have already begun.

  • 11 May 2011

    Up to 10,000 disabled people are joining the Hardest Hit march in London today, in protest against government cuts to benefits and services.

  • 10 May 2011

    Football is woven into the historical, cultural and social fabric of communities in Scotland and across Britain, but media attention to 'soccernomics' focuses heavily on the English Premier League, says Simon Barrow. There are some clear reasons for this, but we definitely need some fresh ideas about ‘football as if fans mattered’ which begin with the wider picture, rather than consigning the non-elite to our peripheral vision.

  • 10 May 2011

    Sharing ideas at a local, regional and national level, and discussing how to respond to the threat of cuts, will not always be easy, says Savi Hensman. But it is vital if those who are poorest and most vulnerable are to be protected and a government-led agenda based on false premises appropriately resisted.

  • 10 May 2011

    The Student Christian Movement is appalled by suggestions that elite universities should be allowed to sell off super-expensive places to wealthy students.

  • 9 May 2011

    There can be no one who voted or campaigned for the Alternative Vote who believed it to be anything other than a first step towards full reform of the electoral system. Initially, Nick Clegg's petulant description of it as a “miserable little compromise” seemed an example of the perfect being permitted to become the enemy of the possible. However, it now seems that the pursuit of incremental change may have turned out to be a mistake.