Features

  • 18 Sep 2014

    A confident and independent Scotland, far from deserting its neighbours, might actually end up being a better friend, argues writer Nick Thorpe, analysing the language used to describe the referendum choices and how it can both lead and mislead.

  • 14 Sep 2014

    An independent Scotland could be the start of something even bigger: disaffected voters in England, Wales and Northern Ireland motivated to find a different society, say Molly and John Harvey, senior church figures in Scotland. They write with only days to go before the historic referendum on self-government.

  • 22 Aug 2014

    On 24 March 1980 in El Salvador, Archbishop Oscar Romero was celebrating Mass in the chapel of a cancer hospital. In his homily he spoke of the Eucharist as a sacrament of solidarity, justice and peace. Moments later, the Archbishop was shot through the heart. As Pope Francis calls for this courageous and inspiring man to be beatified, Bernadette Meaden highlights the significance of his life and death for Christian social witness, as it resonates across the years.

  • 24 Jul 2014

    Operation Protective Edge: here is a new military initiative that has fired up many Israelis, infuriated many Palestinians, left the Arab leaders once more in tatters of nonchalance or fragmentation and challenged the moral fibre of the West in terms of its support or opposition to this campaign. Middle East expert Dr Harry Hagopian looks behind the horror and the headlines from Gaza.

  • 24 Jul 2014

    It is is over a month and a half since the last RUSI conference at Church House, focusing as it did on land warfare, and they have been back for more with a focus this time on the “future of air warfare”: Drones, in other words. The Rev Dr Keith Hebden explores the entanglement of the Church of England is military industries and warfare, highlighting the contradictions between this and the mission of Christian peacemaking.

  • 22 Jul 2014

    The consequences of a No vote in September’s independence referendum can be envisaged no more sharply than through the lens of the NHS in Scotland, says Dr Willie Wilson, setting out the reasons why a Yes vote in the 18 September 2014 referendum is vital for the sake of its 158,000 workers and for the benefit of everyone in Scotland who needs or will need health services free at the point of need.

  • 18 Jul 2014

    Welfare, education and the NHS are all being hit by the same cuts, driven, not by a desire to improve the national debt (which is now significantly worse than 2010), says Virginia Moffatt, but by a poisonous ideology that private profit must come before common good. "So I decided that the time had come to move somewhere, where I can be in a position to challenge that ideology. I have joined Ekklesia as the new Chief Operating Officer, because I can see what an important role a think-tank linking good quality research and ideas to civic action, political change and a positive role for churches and other NGOs can play in influencing mainstream politics. That is what I want to be part of."

  • 19 Jun 2014

    The next UK strategic defence and security review won’t be held until 2015, but debate about whether or not Britain should retain its expensive Trident ballistic missile nuclear deterrent is already hotting up.

  • 10 Jun 2014

    In both Bethlehem and Jerusalem, Pope Francis offered his home in the Vatican as a place for the encounter of prayer. It was a potentially transformative moment. Now that the event is over, and both presidents have re-iterated their desire for peace, what happens next to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict - more so since President Peres completes his term as president of Israel at the end of July? Regional expert and Ekklesia associate Dr Harry Hagopian explores the issues.

  • 3 Jun 2014

    In politics it is more constructive to focus on policies and ideas than on individuals, says Bernadette Meaden. She suggests, however, that a politician may become so wedded to a policy that their personal reputation and the credibility of the policy become inextricably linked. She argues that this is now the case with Iain Duncan Smith.