• January 23, 2015

    When children are murdered, let us call each child by name and name what has been done to her in the name of some cause she will never know or understand. To call a murdered child a suicide bomber is to violate her all over again, says Professor Tina Beattie, in the wake of Boko Haram's deadliest yet attacks in northern Nigeria.

  • January 23, 2015

    Religious fidelity and free speech can learn the art of coexistence despite the acerbic challenges that have flowed from the terrible Paris shootings and the arguments about Charlie Hebdo magazine, says Ekklesia associate and Middle East analyst Dr Harry Hagopian. The much harder – and harsher – question is whether we as followers of a religion or as advocates of free speech can coexist too?

  • January 17, 2015

    As the World Council of Churches (WCC) promotes the vision of a “pilgrimage of justice and peace”, four students from the Ecumenical Institute in Bossey, Switzerland, share their understanding of justice and peace and how they embarked on a pilgrimage of their own. Writer and photographer Sandra Cox talks to them.

  • January 8, 2015

    On the centenary of the beginning of the terrible Armenian genocide in 1915, can Turkey show the good will and good faith needed to repair and repopulate the destroyed Armenian nest, asks Ekklesia associate and regional expert Dr Harry Hagopian. Can it act so that its hitherto legal denial of a human truth does not breed further oppression, but challenges it instead?

  • December 27, 2014

    This year Prince Charles visited the Armenian Orthodox, Chaldean Catholic, Coptic Orthodox and Syrian Orthodox Churches during the course of 2014. In the case of the Syriac Church, he visited them twice in one short year. Ekklesia associate and Middle East analyst Dr Harry Hagopian assesses the significance of these acts of concern and solidarity.

  • December 23, 2014

    Ferguson is in turmoil. So is New York. And so is Union Theological Seminary in the city of New York, a long-standing institution of theological education located on the upper west side of Manhattan – or in West Harlem – since 1836. Annegreth Schilling, a German theologian currently at Union, looks at the social and political location and witness of theology in a troubled and unjust world.

  • December 19, 2014

    The ‘power’ of Christmas – as symbol, story, narrative, myth – lies in its reminder of God’s disinterest in glamour, cool and position. It reminds us that God, as ultimate Other, does not need all the things many of us think are fundamental, but are actually props for our vanity, our position, and even our desire to serve the institution, says the Rev Rachel Mann in an intensely personal reflection on the meaning of the season.

  • December 2, 2014

    In Africa, where up to 40 per cent of the health care facilities are provided by faith related organisations, Dr Mirfin Mpundu, executive director of the Ecumenical Pharmaceutical Network (EPN), says that due to their unique position, churches can play a special role in eliminating HIV and AIDS and bringing improvements in the lives of people living with the virus.

  • November 29, 2014

    Pope Francis has undertaken a fourth papal visit to Turkey amid much ignorance and misunderstanding. Ekklesia associate and regional expert Dr Harry Hagopian says that the present leader of the worldwide Catholic Church came to Ankara and Istanbul with three overarching objectives. He looks at what those are and why they are important politically and religiously.

  • November 24, 2014

    [Picking up on the debate at Stirling University on 23.10.14, the introductory blog to this topic by Alison Jasper and John I’Anson, the contribution by Sarah Clark, and the first comment piece