Features

  • 2 Nov 2011

    The protest at St Paul's was seen by an unexpectedly large number of people as the expression of a widespread and deep exasperation with the financial establishment that shows no sign at all of diminishing, says Archbishop Rowan Williams, as he goes on to back practical, morally based measures to address the economic crisis - including the Robin Hood Tax on financial transactions.

  • 27 Oct 2011

    A great obstacle to a just peace today is the high level of unemployment among young people all over the world, says Dr Olav Fykse Tveit, general secretary of the World Council of Churches. It feels as though we are gambling with the welfare and happiness of a whole generation. Yet we need the vision and the courage of young people to help make vital changes, not least when we see how they are leading processes of democratization and peace in many countries today.

  • 27 Oct 2011

    A new survey is about to be released concerning the values of those who work in the financial services industry. Giles Fraser, who has resigned as Canon Chancellor of St Paul's Cathedral over threats to forcibly evict Occupy anti-corporate greed protesters, says that mutual obligations are a more important guide to financial ethics than trading heavily mediated by technology and less and less reliant on direct human contact.

  • 17 Oct 2011

    It is in the interplay between the ‘might’ of God (a substantial proportion of religiously conservative men and women) and Caesar (the military) that many indigenous Christian communities need to negotiate amid the complexities of the Middle East and North Africa today, says Harry Hagopian. In which direction should they seek a path to security?

  • 8 Oct 2011

    Afghanistan's war enters its second decade with the Taliban emboldened and the United States enfeebled, says Professor Paul Rogers. But the power-play between Pakistan, India and China is also now central to an assessment of what comes next. Afghanistan's future will be decided in Islamabad, New Delhi and Beijing as much as, if not more, than in Kabul and Washington.

  • 5 Oct 2011

    In the city of Calvin where Reformed and Protestant roots run deep, migrant churches are bringing a new dimension to the theological and church situation. Recently, more than twenty churches, most from migrant backgrounds, came together to raise concerns of migrant communities support their efforts for integration and reflect on the evolving ecclesial landscape in Geneva, Switzerland.

  • 5 Oct 2011

    The term 'minorities', when applied to Christian and other communities in the Middle East, opens up a range of contradictory emotions and responses, says Dr Harry Hagopian. But perhaps there could be a greater alliance of purposes among those who do and do not use this term, distinguishing a definition that allows for a range of legal and political remedies for those involved, while distancing it from its more disparaging, negative, intimidating and unhelpful resonances?

  • 3 Oct 2011

    Ask anyone if they can imagine a world without nuclear weapons, and as polls indicate, most will say they can, points out Jonathan Frerichs, World Council of Churches' programme executive for peace building and disarmament. This is true even in countries that possess nuclear weapons according to the International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons or ICAN, a new civil society initiative dedicated to the hope of a nuclear free world.

  • 28 Sep 2011

    The Geneva Interfaith Forum on Climate Change, Environment and Human Rights is an informal group of faith-based NGOs that gathered in September 2011 to reaffirm the responsibility of each faith and spiritual tradition to care for the environment and to play a role in addressing climate change and its impact on the human rights of the world’s population. This is its call for action.

  • 27 Sep 2011

    An apparently religious marker is frequently used to break down populations into ‘Muslims’ and ‘others’, with the ‘others’ often being called, more charitably, ‘the minorities’ of the Middle East, says Dr Michael Marten from the University of Stirling. There are many problems with this kind of designation, he suggests: primarily that it feeds into binary understandings of the world exemplified by the misleading ‘clash of civilisations‘ model.