News Brief

  • 9 Jun 2014

    Around thirty people have this morning used cars to block all entrances to the Atomic Weapons Establishment in Berkshire, marking an escalation in protests there.

  • 7 Jun 2014

    Despite significant gains, the HIV/AIDS epidemic is far from over, UN officials said yesterday (6 June), calling for greater political commitment, investment and innovation.

  • 6 Jun 2014

    Support is growing within Labour for the idea that the party should oppose the renewal of Trident. The decision is due in 2016. Polls consistently show a majority of British voters opposed to Trident. Religious groups, including fairly middle-of-the-road churches, are speaking out against it. Protests at nuclear bases are increasing. Will Ed Miliband have the courage to listen to the majority of the public rather than senior Labour figures who are stuck in the 1980s?

  • 6 Jun 2014

    A judge at the High Court in Islamabad has ordered the Pakistani police to open a criminal investigation into CIA involvement in a drone strike that killed three people on 31 December 2009.

  • 5 Jun 2014

    The response to the abdication of Juan Carlos and the comic-opera events which took place yesterday (4 June) in the palace of Westminster illustrate both the absurdity and the emotional pull of monarchy.

  • 5 Jun 2014

    Lawyers for Mohammad Ahmad Ghulam Rabban, held for over a decade without charge in Guantánamo Bay, have sought a court order compelling the Obama administration to release videotapes of his treatment.

  • 5 Jun 2014

    Health service staff angry that their pay is still being capped despite the economic recovery, are to remind the government today of the millions of hours of unpaid overtime they put in each year.

  • 4 Jun 2014

    The Queen's Speech this morning (4 June) set out the government's proposed legislative agenda for its final year in power before the general election.

  • 4 Jun 2014

    A young Brazilian Indian leader was assaulted on 2 June by four armed men, despite being under the care of a government protection programme since witnessing the murder of his father-in-law.

  • 3 Jun 2014

    In politics it is more constructive to focus on policies and ideas than on individuals, says Bernadette Meaden. She suggests, however, that a politician may become so wedded to a policy that their personal reputation and the credibility of the policy become inextricably linked. She argues that this is now the case with Iain Duncan Smith.