News Brief

  • December 29, 2007

    Buddhist monks who led anti-government demonstrations in Burma have been selected as the top religion newsmakers of the year 2007, in a poll of secular journalists who write about religion for media in the United States.

  • December 28, 2007

    An independent evaluation of UK-based international development agency Christian Aid’s tsunami programme, which was published last week, has praised its strong and committed response, especially in building new homes.

  • December 28, 2007

    Tens of thousands of young adults from throughout Europe and beyond are expected in Geneva between Christmas and New Year for five days of prayer and reflection organized by the Taizé community.

  • December 28, 2007

    Young people, including survivors of trafficking, from Nepal, Bangladesh and India have gathered in Kathmandu to call on their governments to better protect children from commercial sexual exploitation [CSE] and trafficking.

  • December 27, 2007

    Christmas is offensive, and always will be, says Jonathan Bartley. It legitimates the undermining of those in authority. But it is also about looking after not just those who are “deserving” of love, but those who appear disreputable and unworthy.

  • December 27, 2007

    Former Pakistani Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto, who recently returned to the country to challenge the Pervez Musharraf regime, has been assassinated in a suicide attack which has killed 20 others and injured several more.

  • December 27, 2007

    Officials in the Indian state of Orissa have imposed a curfew in the Kandhamal district and appealed for calm after clashes involving Hindu nationalists and the minority Christian community.

  • December 27, 2007

    Cardinal Cormac Murphy-O’Connor, the senior figure in the Catholic Bishops' Conference of England and Wales, has called for a more welcoming approach to migrants in British national life.

  • December 26, 2007

    Pope Benedict XVI has declared in one of his key Christmas messages that believers facing persecution, torture and death in some parts of the world and those who die forgiving their killers are a sign of hope and faith for humanity.

  • December 26, 2007

    Violence, injustice and greed are the main threats to humanity - and a radical chnage of heart and mind is needed to address them. That was the message from Christmas sermons delivered yesterday by the Archbishops of Canterbury and York.