Operation Noah appoints front rank campaigner to push climate change action

Operation Noah appoints front rank campaigner to push climate change action

By staff writers
14 Dec 2006

Operation Noah, the churches' campaign to avert catastrophic climate change, has appointed Ann Pettifor, one of the architects of the widely-praised Jubilee 2000 anti-debt initiative, as its new Campaign Director.

Operation Noah is a joint project of the Environmental Issues Network of Churches Together in Britain and Ireland, the official ecumenical body, and of the campaigning group Christian Ecology Link.

David Pickering, chairperson of Operation Noah, said today: "We are delighted to announce that Ann Pettifor will bring her extensive experience of campaigning and advocacy to the vital cause of climate change. Ann worked closely with the churches during the Jubilee 2000 campaign, and credits the faith organisations with much of the impact made by Jubilee 2000 both in the UK and also internationally."

He added: "The threat of climate change means that faith organisations will once again have to mobilise, this time to bring about the changes needed to 'cut the carbon' and stabilise global carbon emissions. We look forward to Ann heading up the Operation Noah Campaign to tackle the biggest threat facing humanity in the 21st century."

Ann Pettifor has been executive director of Advocacy International, director of Jubilee Research at the New Economics Foundation in London, and is the former director of Jubilee 2000. She is also editor of 'The Real World Economic Outlook', an alternative to the IMF's World Economic Outlook.

In her writings Ms Pettifor seeks to show how the debt crisis came about and how capital flows have reversed direction in recent years. In effect, she suggests, rich countries have been financed by the poorer nations of the developing world - quite the reverse of the post-war model. She links this to the instability witnessed in much of the developing world today and suggests that if the unfair economics behind global debt are not addressed, then the backlash among poor nations will continue to grow.

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