Features

  • 28 Apr 2011

    With Easter Sunday this year coinciding for the first time with the memorial day for the 1915 Armenian Genocide, Harry Hagopian explores a painful history and asks how, in the present and future, those who inherit the mantle of the victims can move forward to discover new life.

  • 25 Apr 2011

    A new song was playing on Iraqi Kurdistan radio just before Easter, which included the lines, "Don't kill this generation" and "don't kill the future." Michele Naar-Obed from Christian Peacemaker Teams (CPT) recounts part of the untold story of nonviolent action and brutal state violence in Suleimaniya and Kawler, the state capital.

  • 25 Apr 2011

    If you're not convinced that Anzac Day in New Zealand bears the hallmarks of fundamentalist religious belief, try questioning anything about the state's most holy day and feel the vitriolic reaction, says Sande Ramage, exploring the myths around Easter and Anzac, which coincide in 2011.

  • 22 Apr 2011

    Jim Hodgson is a journalist with extensive experience in Latin America and the Caribbean. Since 2000, he has worked with the United Church of Canada’s Caribbean and Latin America desk. Over the past 25 years he has written for a variety of church-based media and worked for extended periods in the Dominican Republic and in Mexico. He recently spoke at a seminar on Theology and Ecology held in Buenos Aires, Argentina at the end of March 2011.

  • 18 Apr 2011

    Two of the worst atrocities of the 20th century started in the month of April, reports Mike O'Sullivan.The killing of 1.5 million Armenians in Ottoman Empire Turkey in 1915 and 1916, and the slaughter of 800,000 Tutsis and moderate Hutus in Rwanda in 1994.

  • 08 Apr 2011

    Is humanitarian military intervention correctly characterised 'lesser evil'? John Heathershaw considers five questions about the nature and the prospects of intervention in Libya. He asks poignantly where the responsibility is in the much-vaunted ‘responsibility to protect’?

  • 08 Apr 2011

    The hunger fast for a moral US budget has gone spiritually viral, says Jim Wallis. It has brought together Christian, secular, community and service organisations around a clear message: there are clear economic choices to be made, and the moral ones recognise the priority of the poorest and most vulnerable.

  • 06 Apr 2011

    The west’s military-political strategy against the Gaddafi regime echoes its flawed approach to Afghanistan and Iraq, says Professor Paul Rogers. Nato is a military alliance, whose political masters still seem unable to think more creatively. The living consequences of Afghanistan and Iraq make the vacuum in Libya all the more dismaying.

  • 03 Apr 2011

    Is the churches’ current theological reflection on stewardship and climate change ready for the rapid shifting of winds, weather, and life on earth as we know it, asks Marcelo Schneider. How can a renewed eco-theology reshape our attitudes, beliefs and actions to reflect the Christian priority of planetary justice?

  • 02 Apr 2011

    In the end the prospects for democracy depend on whether the rebels can mobilise support politically throughout Libya, says Mary Kaldor. The problem with the military approach is that it entrenches division. The preoccupation with classic military means is undermining the capacity to address growing insecurity and risks a deteriorating situation.