Features

  • 11 Sep 2009

    Following recent action by Africa, a majority of the world's countries have now banned nuclear weapons from their national territory for the first time, says Jonathan Frerichs. The churches have played an important role in this.

  • 07 Sep 2009

    Bankruptcy is on the increase, says Giles Fraser. There is tragedy in economic brokenness, but also hope. Debt forgiveness has the whiff of salvation and biblical Jubilee about it.

  • 07 Sep 2009

    Gerrard Winstanley was a ‘true leveller’ in the C17th and a significant theologian, says biblical scholar Chris Rowland. We do well to remember his words and example.

  • 26 Aug 2009

    The armed conflict in Angola ended seven years ago, says Juan Michel but the consequences of four decades of war are felt still today. And women seem to be bearing most of the brunt.

  • 22 Aug 2009

    The National Health Service has continued to take a bashing in the USA, says Giles Fraser. The outrage of the religious right is fuelled by ignorance and prejudice, he argues.

  • 05 Aug 2009

    A joint statement from groups working together in the Church of England

  • 04 Aug 2009

    The current situation for Israelis and Palestinians is miserable and stalemated, says Harry Hagopian. But in analysing the role, outlook and prospects for each of the protagonists in the region, he argues that a break with the politics of despair is essential.

  • 23 Jul 2009

    From the smallest village to the biggest town in eastern Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) people are yearning for peace, says Fredrick Nzwili. Church leaders are encouraging the rebel fighters to disarm.

  • 21 Jul 2009

    After a year as an Anglican military chaplain, Ekklesia partner Sande Ramage reflects on her experience and makes some proposals for how the role might be changed

  • 21 Jul 2009

    Some hardline pressure groups within the church are sucking mar­riage into a narrow religious ghetto, associating it with suburban 1950s curtain-twitching, thus making it even less popular than it is now, says Giles Fraser.