Features

  • 22 Mar 2008

    The Seven Deadly Sins have been given a makeover. Yet before the makeover artists get to work maybe all Christians should pause and consider the sin business, says Glynn Cardy.

  • 21 Mar 2008

    There have been all kinds of speculations about the religious convictions and background of US presidential candidate Barack Obama. Justin Thacker looks at his Christian outlook and asks what his relation is to evangelicalism.

  • 21 Mar 2008

    "Know that you are dust and to dust you shall return", the church says in its liturgy. Where else do we speak of such things in public? asks Giles Fraser, reflecting on our cultural habit of shrinking from the reality of death.

  • 14 Mar 2008

    In a reflection on faith and human rights for Easter, Savi Hensman argues that issues of life and death and the question about whether Christians are on the side of the powerful or the powerless go to the heart of the Gospel story.

  • 02 Mar 2008

    Talk of 'moral' foreign policy has led to 'liberal interventionism', notes Giles Fraser. And along that path of good intention has lain disaster, as with some 'just war' thinking.

  • 27 Feb 2008

    Doyen US religion commentator Martin Marty gives an American perspective on the argument about civil and religious law sparked by Rowan Williams.

  • 21 Feb 2008

    In a world where we are used to generalizing, it is inevitable that we will continue to use expressions like “the rich” and “the poor”, says Paul Mukerji. But his time in Colombia led him to question the way this division is formulated.

  • 21 Feb 2008

    War is hellish and so are its consequences, says Andrew Weaver. As the next anniversary of the Iraq war looms, the pastoral and psychological needs of veterans must not be forgotten.

  • 14 Feb 2008

    Two evangelical Anglican bishops have come out with contrasting statements on homosexuality recently, points out Mark Vernon. One recognises that the issue is about love, the other sees only rules, it seems.

  • 10 Feb 2008

    Christianity has suffered as a result of trying to subject an ineffable and transcendent God to the inevitable limitations of speculative philosophy, says Giles Fraser. But divine reality impinges upon us much more immediately in the Gospel.