Williams and Sudanese archbishop discuss peace agreement with Brown

Williams and Sudanese archbishop discuss peace agreement with Brown

By staff writers
11 Jan 2010

Sudanese Archbishop Daniel Deng has told Gordon Brown to support the fragile peace in Sudan by backing the country’s Comprehensive Peace Agreement (CPA).

This afternoon, along with the Archbishop of Canterbury, Rowan Williams, he met with the UK Prime Minister as part of the new Sudan365 campaign to prevent a resumption of war in that country.

"I am urging the Government and appealing to them to support the CPA and make the CPA fully implemented, because they are part of it," said Archbishop Daniel Deng, in a reference to the UK’s role in helping to negotiate the five-year-old CPA.

Last year saw violence that left 2,500 people dead and 350,000 displaced from their homes in the south of the country. Instability continues in the Darfur region and it is feared that the situation across Sudan could worsen in the coming months.

"The UK Churches can also help people in Sudan", said Archbishop Daniel Deng. "UK churches have a role in supporting the Church in Sudan, so that we can become strong advocates and bring support to our people."

He added that the Church in Sudan has been, and continues to be, the country’s leading advocate for peace and justice.

"During the war, the Church in Sudan stepped up to be the 'middle person' who could speak on behalf of those who could not speak for themselves," he said. "We managed to tell the world of the horrible situation."

However, the Archbishop said that war had not been a religious war but one in which people were deprived of their basic rights. "It was a war of marginalisation," he said. "When you are marginalised as a human being, you have to struggle for your rights."

He also said that the suffering in Sudan was caused not by God but by human selfishness. "Suffering is not from God, suffering is from mankind," he said. "This suffering is caused by ambition to get things for yourself."

Keywords: sudan
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