Global Fund shortfall 'will reverse progress and cost lives'

Global Fund shortfall 'will reverse progress and cost lives'

By agency reporter
6 Oct 2010

The level of financial support for the Global Fund has fallen far short of the $20 billion called for by aid agencies, according to Tearfund.

The Christian relief and development agency says that donor governments have only committed to $11.7billion and the UK Government has yet to meet its fair share of £840 million over the next three years.

The UK has so far given a projected contribution of £384 million which is still subject to the Government’s multilateral aid review.

Paul Cook, Tearfund Advocacy Director said: "This is extremely disappointing because the $20 billion target was realistic to support the range of vital programmes fighting HIV, TB and malaria. The demand for funding through the Global Fund will now outstrip the commitments made. A shortfall of $8.3 billion could now result in millions of deaths that could easily be prevented, and could reverse much of the progress made so far.

"This is a missed opportunity in the fight against the top three killer diseases. The Global Fund has strengthened infrastructure and expanded human resource for health. It works closely with faith-based organisations like Tearfund and we see the impact and the value for money, as every dollar donated goes to fund programs in the countries most impacted by these diseases."

The Global Fund has had a convincing track record. It has delivered results such as: providing anti-retroviral therapy to 2.5 million people living with HIV; detecting and treating six million people living with TB; and distributing 104 million insecticide-treated nets to prevent malaria.

"The aim was to scale up universal access to treatment and contribute towards the achievement of the HIV and other health related MDGs," adds Paul. "A shortfall of 40 per cent will only be catastrophic to the programmes trying to achieve this."

[Ekk/2]

Keywords: global fund | tearfund
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