Charity analyses eviction rates across England

By agency reporter
13 Dec 2011

New research released today (13 December) by the housing and homelessness charity Shelter, highlights the areas of England where people are most at risk of losing their home.

With one in every 111 households at risk of eviction, those living in London, Manchester, Slough and Peterborough are shown to be most at risk.

The report also shows that areas with high unemployment tend to be hit hardest by high eviction rates – news that comes just weeks after figures revealed the highest unemployment rate since 1996.

Shelter’s statistics, which analyse the risk of eviction by a landlord or mortgage lender for homes in local authorities across England, also show that :

* the capital has the highest risk of eviction, with the top twelve local authorities in the research all London boroughs
* outside London, there are clusters of high risk in the North West and the Midlands
* Nottingham, Newcastle and Knowsley all have eviction risk rates more than one and a half times the national average
* urban areas are more likely to have higher rates of eviction risk, however rural areas like West Lancashire and Bedford are also affected, with levels higher than the national average
* rates of possession claims are so high that every two minutes someone faces losing their home.

Campbell Robb, chief executive of Shelter, said: "As Christmas approaches, this research paints a frightening picture of thousands of families living every day with the fear of losing their home hanging over their heads. It’s sobering to see that so many communities are blighted by the risk of eviction.

"Shelter research shows that a third of people are already struggling with their housing costs or falling behind on payments. In these unforgiving conditions, it only takes one thing – illness, job loss or relationship breakdown – to lead to things spiralling out of control and into homelessness."

[Ekk/4]

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