Syria: solving the unsolvable

Syria: solving the unsolvable

Developments in Syria continue to take alarming twists - not least with the latest eyewitness accounts coming out of Homs.

A week ago I did another regional Middle East round up for the Catholic Bishops' Conference of England and Wales (CBCEW), together with an in-depth look at the bloodshed in Homs, Syria. Is this a precursor to civil war in the country, we have been asking? Or are we already beyond that point?

In the first of two podcasts, shared as usual on Ekklesia, the aim is to take a close look at countries in transition. We start with the election of an interim president in Yemen, move on to tribal tensions in Libya and conclude by discussing post-election Egypt ahead of another round of voting: this time for a new president.

Then, as I indicated, in the second podcast we examine the escalation of violence in Syria - especially in the city of Homs.

Both full podcasts (15 and 17 mins respectively) can be downloaded/played from the two links in the right-hand column here: http://www.catholicnews.org.uk/mena18

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© Harry Hagopian is an international lawyer, ecumenist and EU political consultant. He also acts as a Middle East and inter-faith advisor to the Catholic Bishops’ Conference of England & Wales and as Middle East consultant to ACEP (Christians in Politics) in Paris. He is an Ekklesia associate and regular contributor (http://www.ekklesia.co.uk/HarryHagopian). Formerly an Executive Secretary of the Jerusalem Inter-Church Committee and Executive Director of the Middle East Council of Churches, he is now an international fellow, Sorbonne III University, Paris, consultant to the Campaign for Recognition of the Armenian Genocide (UK) and author of The Armenian Church in the Holy Land. Dr Hagopian’s own website is www.epektasis.net

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