Campaign Against Arms Trade awarded 'Alternative Nobel Prize'

By agency reporter
27 Sep 2012

Campaign Against Arms Trade (CAAT) has been awarded one of the four Right Livelihood Awards for 2012 for their innovative and effective campaigning against the arms trade. CAAT is an independent campaigning organisation based in Finsbury Park, north London.

The award is made by the Right Livelihood Award Foundation, based in Stockholm, and honours organisations and individuals "offering practical and exemplary answers to the most urgent challenges to us today." It is often referred to as the 'Alternative Nobel Prize'. The award, which carries a cash prize of 50,000 Euros, will be formally presented in a ceremony at the Swedish Parliament on 7 December 2012.

Three other Right Livelihood Awards went to Hayrettin Karaca, for his lifetime of tireless advocacy and environmental activism in Turkey, Sima Samar, for her long-standing dedication to human rights, especially women's rights, in Afghanistan, and Gene Sharp of the USA, for developing, articulating and applying the principles of non-violent resistance around the world.

Executive Director of the Right Livelihood Academy, Ole von Uxekull, said: "Our jury was deeply impressed by CAAT's work. We often say that the recipients honour the award as much as the award honours the recipients. It is great to have CAAT as a new member in the Right Livelihood Award family."

Henry McLaughlin, Fundraising Coordinator at CAAT, said: "We are absolutely delighted to receive this recognition from the Right Livelihood Award Foundation. CAAT has campaigned effectively to expose and challenge the arms trade since 1974. This award honours the hard work of thousands of activists around the UK, and we hope the publicity it generates will help us get our argument across: that it is not OK for the government to promote weapons sales. We also hope the publicity the award creates will help our partners in other countries to get their message across."

[Ekk/4]

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